The Kreutzer Sonata and Other Stories

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Penguin, 1985 - Fiction - 287 pages
2 Reviews
While "The Kreutzer Sonata" caused a public sensation, Tolstoy's wife, Sonya, was hurt and furious that he should have enriched his scathing indictment of marriage with private details from theri own life together. Tolstoy, during two years of obsessive unhappiness, had become convinced that the idea of a "Christian marriage" was an impossibility. Here he lets loose all his frustration and disgust at human sexuality, and the humiliating, ungodly, sensual tie that binds men to women. The curious result, part self-lacerating, confession, part Christian polemic, is moving, above all, as the story of a man whose sexual jealousy, inflamed by guilt, drives him to murder his wife.
  

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Review: The Kreutzer Sonata and Other Stories

User Review  - Vanjr - Goodreads

Most do not like this book, but I enjoyed the stories and some of the lessons they teach. It is certainly a welcome change from War and Peace. Read full review

Review: The Kreutzer Sonata and Other Stories

User Review  - Goodreads

Most do not like this book, but I enjoyed the stories and some of the lessons they teach. It is certainly a welcome change from War and Peace. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

The Kreutzer Sonata
25
The Devil
119
The Forged Coupon
175
After the Ball
255
Postface to the Kreutzer Sonata
267
Alternative Conclusion to The Devil
283
Notes
286
Copyright

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Page 9 - For there are some eunuchs, which were so born from their mother's womb: and there are some eunuchs, which were made eunuchs of men: and there be eunuchs, which have made themselves eunuchs for the kingdom of heaven's sake. He that is able to receive it, let him receive it.

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About the author (1985)

Leo Tolstoy was born in central Russia in 1828. He studied Oriental languages and law (although failed to earn a degree in the latter) at the University of Kazan, and after a dissolute youth eventually joined an artillery regiment in the Caucasus in 1851. He took part in the Crimean War, and the Sebastopol Sketches that emerged from it established his reputation. After living for some time in St Petersburg and abroad, he married Sophie Behrs in 1862 and they had thirteen children. The happiness this brought him gave him the creative impulse for his two greatest novels, War and Peace (1869) and Anna Karenina (1877). Later in life his views became increasingly radical as he gave up his possessions to live a simple peasant life. After a quarrel with his wife he fled home secretly one night to seek refuge in a monastery. He became ill during this dramatic flight and died at the small railway station of Astapovo in 1910.

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