The War of the Worlds

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Berkley Books, Jun 15, 1985 - 173 pages
For more than 100 years this compelling tale of the Martian invasion of Earth has enthralled readers with a combination of imagination and incisive commentary on the imbalance of power that continues to be relevant today. Features a new Introduction. Revised reissue.

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Review: The War of the Worlds

User Review  - Michelle Tempted By Books - Goodreads

An incredible Sci Fi tale, told so well you can almost believe it really happened. The graphic portrayal of an Alien invasion, this one being from Martians, is nothing short of plausible. The ... Read full review

Review: The War of the Worlds

User Review  - Rhonda - Goodreads

I enjoyed this book more than I thought I would. It had a strong plot, was engaging and made the reader think. Read full review

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Contents

THE COMING OF THE MARTIANS 1 The Eve of the War
7
The Falling Star
13
On Horsell Common
17
Copyright

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About the author (1985)

Herbert George Wells was born in Bromley, Kent, England, on September 21, 1866. His father was a professional cricketer and sometime shopkeeper, his mother a former lady's maid. Although "Bertie" left school at fourteen to become a draper's apprentice (a life he detested), he later won a scholarship to the Normal School of Science in London, where he studied with the famous Thomas Henry Huxley. He began to sell articles and short stories regularly in 1893. In 1895, his immediately successful novel rescued him from a life of penury on a schoolteacher's salary. His other "scientific romances"--The Island of Dr. Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897), The War of the Worlds (1898), The First Men in the Moon (1901), and The War in the Air (1908)--won him distinction as the father of science fiction.

Henry James saw in Wells the most gifted writer of the age, but Wells, having coined the phrase "the war that will end war" to describe World War I, became increasingly disillusioned and focused his attention on educating mankind with his bestselling Outline of History (1920) and his later utopian works. Living until 1946, Wells witnessed a world more terrible than any of his imaginative visions, and he bitterly observed: "Reality has taken a leaf from my book and set itself to supercede me."

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