Mémorial de Sainte Hélène: journal of the private life and conversations of the Emperor Napoleon at St. Helena, Volume 4

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1823
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Page 321 - WEEP, daughter of a royal line, A Sire's disgrace, a realm's decay; Ah ! happy if each tear of thine Could wash a father's fault away...
Page 281 - They, moreover, had the insolence to make their payments, when they had any to make, by giving bills on persons in London. Hence the vast profits reaped by the English manufacturers and brokers, entirely to our prejudice. I made a law that no American should import goods, to any amount, without immediately exporting their exact equivalent. A loud outcry was raised against this : it was said that I had ruined trade. But what was the consequence ? Notwithstanding the closing of my ports and in spite...
Page 280 - ... or manufactures, and internal trade, made immense progress during my reign. The application of chemistry to the manufactures, caused them to advance with giant strides. I gave an impulse, the effects of which, extended throughout Europe. ' Foreign trade, which, in its results, is infinitely inferior to agriculture, was an object of subordinate importance in my mind. Foreign trade is made for agriculture and home industry, and not the two latter for the former. The interests of these three fundamental...
Page 205 - Those defects and that anarchy are converted to their own advantage by the greatest number. " I can, consistently with the interests of my empire, do a great deal of good to Spain. What are the best means to be adopted ? " Shall I go to Madrid ? Shall I take upon myself the office of Grand Protector in deciding between the father and the son ? It seems to me a matter of difficulty to support Charles IV. on the throne. His government and his favourite are so very unpopular, that they could not maintain...
Page 206 - ... opinion is that nothing should be hurried forward, and that we should take counsel of events as they occur. It will be necessary to strengthen the bodies of troops which are to be stationed on the frontiers of Portugal, and wait " I do not approve of the step which your Imperial Highness has taken in so precipitately making yourself master of Madrid. The army ought to have been kept ten leagues from the capital.
Page 162 - Amiens, the terms having been agreed upon, he had promised to sign the next day at a certain hour : something of consequence detained him at home, but he pledged his word. The evening of that same day, a courier arrived from London proscribing certain articles of the treaty, but he answered that he had signed, and immediately came and actually signed. We understood each other perfectly well; I had placed a regiment at his disposal, and he took pleasure in seeing its manoeuvres.
Page 321 - In 1814, at the time of my visit to London, I had the honour of being presented to the Prince of Wales at Carlton House." — "And what the devil did you want there ?" said the Emperor. " I do not wonder that your Majesty is surprised ; but I was induced by a sort of point of honour : I thought I could do no other. There were many French in London...
Page 279 - ... prohibitions ; there will always be found means to defeat the object of the legislator. In France we are still very far behind on these delicate points, which are still unperceived or ill understood by the mass of society. Yet, what advancement have we not made ; what correctness of ideas has been introduced by my gradual classification of agriculture, industry, and trade; objects so distinct in themselves, and which present so great and positive a graduation!
Page 280 - English which I brought about. We have now the secret of the commercial treaty of 1783. France still exclaims against its author; but the English demanded it on pain of resuming the war. They wished to do the same after the treaty of Amiens; but I was then all-powerful; I was a hundred cubits high. I replied that if they were in possession of the heights of Montmartre I would still refuse to sign the treaty. These words were echoed through Europe. " The English will now impose some such treaty on...
Page 207 - Spain stands in need of having the machine of her government re-organized, and that she requires a system of laws to protect the people against the tyranny and encroachments of feudality, with institutions that may revive industry, agriculture, and the arts. You will describe to them the state of tranquillity and plenty enjoyed...

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