The Founders of the Indian Empire: Clive, Warren Hastings, and Wellesley. Lord Clive, Volume 1

Front Cover
W. H. Allen, 1882 - India - 516 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

kóta campaign Clive is appointed commissary to
43
The French take advantage of the departure of Admiral
50
Honours conferred upon and advantages granted to
57
Showing how affairs arrived at the point already described
59
Is convinced from what he sees that the only chance
65
Effect of the capture of Arkät on the force besieging Trichi PAGE
74
The assault 856
87
Joy of Clive 889
97
The insurrection in North Arkitt breaks out
103
Battle of Kávéripák 10811
112
Clive devises a plan for cutting off Law from his base
122
The activity of Clive and the inactivity of Law
126
His mind required absolute rest 447
129
Criticism on the conduct of Clive
134
The sudden murder of the new Sábahdār is turned to good
135
He schools his raw soldiers
140
Captures Kovilam
141
Progression of affairs in Southern India during the
147
Admiral Watson sails against Gheriah with a land force
153
On learning the capture of Calcutta the Madras Government
159
Clive is selected and sails with Admiral Watson for
162
The feat of the drunken sailor Strahan 1689
169
Meanwhile Sirájud daulah marches against Calcutta
175
Amongst a certain class Clives demeanour and defence
196
An ambiguously worded letter from Sirâjud daulah induces
199
Description of Chandranagar 2023
211
Mr Watts exercised a preponderating influence at Sirájud
217
Unhappy position of Sirâjud daulah
223
Four officers in Madras candidates for the command of
227
Amíchand forces himself into the confidence of Mr Watts
229
Who solves the difficulty by forging the Admirals signature
235
Efforts made by Rájá Dúlab Rám to diminish the price
241
Meanwhile Sirájud daulah has a slight inkling of
247
Incidents arising from the presence of a Dutch ship in
305
The Dutch solve the difficulty by capturing English
310
Recapitulation of what Clive had accomplished in three
323
Clive sails for England his warning before embarking
329
He is pressed to return to India and consents
337
Mír Kásim buys the Sábahdārſ from the Calcutta Council
343
The Calcutta Council formally depose Mír Kásim and
351
At an interview with Mr Wansittart a compromise is agreed
356
His attention is drawn to the corrupt state of the civil
357
Clives past is a protest against his present
363
Mr Sumner
371
Invites Núwāb Nujmud daulah and his surroundings
373
Clives attack and the result 17884
379
Proceeds to Murshidābād to attend the annual ceremony
389
Origin of the payment of double batta to officers 3956
396
They gradually form a combination to force the Government
402
A glance at the position of the Government 4067
410
State of affairs at Sūrajptir and Allāhābād e 41516
416
He calls out the sſpáhſs
420
The combined officers ask to be forgiven
426
Causes of the collapse of the conspiracy
432
His last words to the Council
438
Clive scenting the coming storm but believing he
449
Unrest of Clive renewal of his relations with the Govern
455
Sirájud daulah accepts the terms dictated to him
460
The whole of Clives career in Bengal is raked up
461
FHis enemies are baffled
464
Clive replies with vigour and effect 46970
472
genius revolts
478
The lower nature is tempted and falls with a bound 4823
484
Does the career of the conqueror deaden conscience
495
Sirájud daulah forbids the attack and Clive for
501
Mr Watts and his suite flee from Murshidābād and join
508

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 493 - And that which should accompany old age, As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends, I must not look to have ; but, in their stead, Curses, not loud but deep, mouth-honour, breath, Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not.
Page 471 - English money, of 234,000/. ; and that, in so doing, the said Robert Lord Clive abused the power with which he was intrusted, to the evil example of the servants of the public, and to the dishonour and detriment of the State.
Page 383 - He received the proposal of having a sum of money for "himself and his household at his will with infinite " pleasure, and the only reflection he made upon leaving " me was : ' Thank God ! I shall now have as many " ' dancing girls as I please ! ' "f The sagacious views of Clive, on the contrary, went far beyond his treaty or his time.
Page 387 - The perpetual struggles for superiority between the Nabobs and your Agents, together with the recent proofs before us of notorious and avowed corruption, have rendered us unanimously of opinion, after the most mature deliberation, that no other method can be suggested of laying the axe to the root of all those evils, than that of obtaining the Dewanny of Bengal, Bahar, and Orissa, for the Company.
Page 470 - I can call my own, except my paternal fortune of 500/. a year ; and which has been in the family for ages past. But upon this I am content to live ; and perhaps I shall find more real content of mind and happiness, than in the trembling affluence of an unsettled fortune.
Page 470 - But to be called upon, after sixteen years have elapsed, to account for my conduct in this manner, and, after an uninterrupted enjoyment of my property, to be questioned, and considered as obtaining it unwarrantably, is hard indeed ! and a treatment I should not think the British Senate capable of.
Page 456 - Commons for leave to bring in a bill " for the better regulation of the affairs of the East India Company and of their servants in India, and for the due administration of justice in Bengal.
Page 375 - His being a Mussulman, acute, and clever, are reasons of themselves, if there were no others, against trusting that man with too much power...
Page 468 - Robert Lord Clive, Baron of Plassey in the kingdom of Ireland, about the time of the deposition of...
Page 466 - That to appropriate acquisitions so made to the private emolument of persons intrusted with any civil or military power of the State is illegal. 3. That very great sums of money, and other valuable property have been acquired in Bengal from Princes and others of that country, by persons entrusted with the military and civil powers of the State by means of such powers ; which sums of money and valuable property have been appropriated to the private use of such persons.

Bibliographic information