The First Chapter of Norwegian Immigration, (1821-1840) Its Causes and Results: With an Introduction on the Services Rendered by the Scandinavians to the World and to America

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author, 1896 - Mormon Church - 476 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
36
IV
43
V
54
VI
77
VII
87
VIII
132
IX
143
XXII
299
XXIII
325
XXIV
356
XXV
360
XXVI
364
XXVII
370
XXVIII
379
XXIX
386

X
170
XI
179
XII
194
XIII
195
XIV
198
XV
202
XVI
219
XVII
237
XVIII
266
XIX
284
XX
290
XXI
296
XXX
395
XXXI
396
XXXII
399
XXXIII
408
XXXIV
410
XXXV
414
XXXVI
416
XXXVII
420
XXXVIII
422
XXXIX
429
XL
432
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Page 422 - Because thou hast kept the word of my patience, I also will keep thee from the hour of temptation, which shall come upon all the world, to try them that dwell upon the earth. Behold, I come quickly: hold that fast which thou hast, that no man take thy crown.
Page 36 - British constitution, representative legislature, the trial by jury, security of property, freedom of mind and person, the influence of public opinion over the conduct of public affairs, the Reformation, the liberty of the press, the spirit of the age, — all that is or has been of value to man in modern times as a member of society, either in Europe or in the New World, may be traced to the spark left burning upon our shores by these northern barbarians.
Page 209 - Is it not to be feared that the land will soon be overpopulated? Is it true that the government there is going to prohibit immigration?" 5-6. What part of the land is settled by Norwegians, and how is it reached? What is the price of land, of cattle, of the necessaries of life? How high are wages? 7. "What kind of religion is there in America? Is...
Page 21 - Christian, calling it Nova Dania. The expedition was, however, a failure, and all but three of the party perished from disease and exposure to cold in the winter of 1620. The three...
Page 136 - Amt. Two brigs are to depart from Stavanger in about eight days from now, and will carry these people to America, and if good reports come from them, the number of emigrants will doubtless be still larger next year. A pressing and general lack of money entering into every branch of industry, stops or at least hampers business and makes it difficult for many people to earn the necessaries of life. While this is the case on this side of the Atlantic there is hope for abundance on the other, and this...
Page 210 - What provision is there for the education of children and for the care of the poor? 9. What language is spoken in America and is it difficult to learn ? 10. Is there danger of disease in America? Is there reason to fear wild animals or the Indians? 11. What kind of people should be advised to emigrate to America? Advice against unreasonable expectations. 12. What dangers may be expected on the ocean? Is it true that those who are taken to America are sold as slaves?
Page 35 - ... altered or abolished, have we not retained, in most things, the opinions, the customs, the manners which that government had a tendency to produce ? Is not this, in fact, the principal source of that courage, of that aversion to slavery, of that empire of honour 'which...
Page 17 - Iceland and found the land as he had expected and remained there exploring the country for two years. At the end of this period he returned to Iceland, giving the newly-discovered country the name of Greenland, in order as he said, to attract settlers, who would be favorably impressed with so pleasing a name.
Page 50 - Parents were compelled to have their children confirmed, and even the dead were exhumed from their graves, in order that they might be buried according to the Lutheran ritual. These cruel facts are perfectly authenticated, and there is not a shadow of doubt that this disgraceful intolerance on the part of the...
Page 71 - ... most of whom belong to families from the vicinity of a little town at the southwestern extremity of Norway, near Cape Stavanger. Those who came from the farms are dressed in coarse cloths of domestic manufacture, of a fashion different from the American, but those who inhabited the town wear calicos, ginghams and gay shawls, imported, we presume, from England.

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