Islam and Christianity in Medieval Anatolia

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Dr Bruno De Nicola, Dr Sara Nur Yıldız, Dr A C S Peacock
Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., Apr 28, 2015 - History - 444 pages
This volume offers a comparative approach to understanding the spread of Muslim culture in medieval Anatolia. It aims to reassess work in the field since the 1971 classic by Speros Vryonis, The Decline of Hellenism in Asia Minor and the Process of Islamization which treats the process of transformation from a Byzantinist perspective. Essays examine the Christian experience of living under Muslim rule, consider encounters between Christianity and Islam in art and intellectual life, and focus on the process of Islamisation as understood from the Arabic, Persian and Turkish textual evidence.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
artIstIC and IntelleCtual enCounters Between
16
Conquest Competition
23
Patterns of armenomuslim Interchange on the armenian
77
The Rape of Anatolia
107
The Greek Orthodox Communities of Nicaea and Ephesus under
147
Notes on its Principles
167
Popular Belief and Cultural Convergence
183
Qāḍī Burhān alDīn
233
What Does the Clapper Say? An Interfaith Discourse on
263
A Reappraisal of Islamic
287
mevleviBektashi rivalries and the Islamisation of the Public
309
Gülşehris Turkish
329
Islamisation through the Lens of the Saltukname
349
Bibliography
365
Index
409

ThirteenthCentury Byzantine Art in Cappadocia and
215
wall Church of Saint George at Belisırma Kırkdamaltı Kilise
230

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About the author (2015)

Andrew Peacock is Reader in Middle Eastern Studies in the School of History, University of St Andrews, UK and is Principal Investigator of the European Research Council-funded research project ‘The Islamisation of Anatolia, c. 1000-1500’. Bruno De Nicola is Research Fellow in Middle Eastern Studies in the School of History, University of St Andrews, UK. Sara Nur Yıldız is a Research Fellow at the University of St Andrews, UK, employed on a European Research Council-funded research project entitled ‘Islamisation of Anatolia, c. 1100-1500’ and is affiliated with the Orient-Institut Istanbul, Turkey.

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