Silent City on a Hill: Picturesque Landscapes of Memory and Boston's Mount Auburn Cemetery

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Univ of Massachusetts Press, 2007 - Architecture - 373 pages
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Originally published in 1989, this book offers an insightful inquiry into the intellectual and cultural origins of Mount Auburn Cemetery, the first landscape in the United States to be designed in the picturesque style. Inspired by developments in England and France, and founded in 1831, Mount Auburn became the prototype for the "rural cemetery" movement and was an important precursor of many of America's public parks, beginning with New York City's Central Park.This new edition has been completely redesigned in a larger format, with new photographs and a new epilogue that carries the story forward into the twentieth century.

Published in association with Library of American Landscape History: http://lalh.org/
 

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Contents

COMMON PITS AND GRIM GRAVEYARDS
15
THE ENGLISH GARDEN Memory Nature and Design
29
THE FRENCH CULT OF ANCESTORS AND THE BIRTH OF PERE LACHAISE
55
AN AMERICAN SENSIBILITY TO MELANCHOLY
81
THE NECESSITY FOR MONUMENTS Art and Public Commemoration in the Young Republic
95
GRAVE PROBLEMS Urban Burial Controversies
117
THE CEMETERY IDEA AND THE FOUNDING OF MOUNT AUBURN
133
CEMETERY OR GARDEN? Landscape Design and Conflicting Institutional Purposes
155
THE RAGE FOR MOUNT AUBURN Sacred Site or Pleasure Ground?
237
TRANSFORMATION TO THE GARDEN OR SCULPTURED CEMETERY
259
More Chapters of Change
279
Trustees and Officers of Mount Auburn with Terms oF Service
291
A Selected Chronology of Notable American Rural or Garden Cemeteries and Major Designers
293
NOTES
297
BIBLIOGRAPHY
331
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
351

ART AND NATURE BALANCED Creating a Marble History in the Forest Cemetery
175
EMBELLISHING THE PICTURESQUE Structures in the Landscape
207

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Page 30 - And when the sun begins to fling His flaring beams, me, Goddess, bring To arched walks of twilight groves, And shadows brown that Sylvan loves Of pine, or monumental oak, Where the rude axe with heaved stroke Was never heard the Nymphs to daunt, Or fright them from their hallowed haunt.
Page 34 - To build, to plant, whatever you intend, To rear the Column, or the Arch to bend, To swell the Terras, or to sink the Grot; In all, let Nature never be forgot.
Page 30 - But the iniquity of oblivion blindly scattereth her poppy, and deals with the memory of men, without distinction to merit of perpetuity.

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About the author (2007)

Blanche M. G. Linden received a Ph.D. in the history of American civilization from Harvard University. She is the author of several books, including Boston Freedom Trail.

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