Drown

Front Cover
Penguin, Jul 1, 1997 - Fiction - 224 pages
3 Reviews
From the beloved and award-winning author Junot Díaz, a spellbinding saga of a family’s journey through the New World.
 
A coming-of-age story of unparalleled power, Drown introduced the world to Junot Díaz's exhilarating talents. It also introduced an unforgettable narrator— Yunior, the haunted, brilliant young man who track his family’s precarious journey from the barrios of Santo Domingo to the tenements of industrial New Jersey, and their epic passage from hope to loss to something like love. Here is the soulful, unsparing book that made Díaz a literary sensation.
 
 

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Great short stories

User Review  - Crazy Wolf - Borders

I HATE FLYING. Years ago I had to fly to new mexico to hang out with a girl {waste of time}. I was freaking out on the plane, but I read Drown and let me say, it felt like Junot Diaz was talking to me ... Read full review

Drown

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Diaz has received much pre-publication praise and publicity for this, his first collection, of short stories. Set in his native Dominican Republic or in the Dominican neighborhoods of New Jersey ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
23
Section 3
47
Section 4
69
Section 5
91
Section 6
111
Section 7
121
Section 8
143
Section 9
153
Section 10
163
Section 11
210
Section 12
211
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Junot Díaz’s fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, and The Best American Short Stories. His highly-anticipated first novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, was greeted with rapturous reviews, including Michiko Kakutani in The New York Times calling it “a book that decisively establishes him as one of contemporary fiction's most distinctive and irresistible new voices.” His debut story collection, Drown, published eleven years prior to Oscar Wao, was also met with unprecedented acclaim; it became a national bestseller, won numerous awards, and has since grown into a landmark of contemporary literature. Born in the Dominican Republic and raised in New Jersey, Díaz lives in New York City and is a professor of creative writing at MIT.

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