Closing of the American Mind

Front Cover
Simon & Schuster, May 15, 1988 - Social Science - 400 pages
15 Reviews
THE BRILLIANT AND CONTROVERSIAL CRITIQUE OF AMERICAN CULTURE WITH NEARLY A MILLION COPIES IN PRINT

 In 1987, eminent political philosopher Allan Bloom published The Closing of the American Mind, an appraisal of contemporary America that “hits with the approximate force and effect of electroshock therapy” (The New York Times) and has not only been vindicated, but has also become more urgent today. In clear, spirited prose, Bloom argues that the social and political crises of contemporary America are part of a larger intellectual crisis: the result of a dangerous narrowing of curiosity and exploration by the university elites.

Now, in this twenty-fifth anniversary edition, acclaimed author and journalist Andrew Ferguson contributes a new essay that describes why Bloom’s argument caused such a furor at publication and why our culture so deeply resists its truths today.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - dham340 - LibraryThing

Decided to read this to see if it was relevant at all. The sad answer is yes, but it flaws are even larger with age. Most of bloom's arguments are of the "get off my lawn" sort of grumpy old men ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kant1066 - LibraryThing

Unless you were attending a university when this book was published, or have a special interest in the general ongoing dialogue we call the culture wars, "The Closing of the American Mind" may not be ... Read full review

Contents

Foreword by Saul Bellow
11
The Clean Slate
47
Books
62
Copyright

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About the author (1988)

Allan Bloom was Professor in the Committee on Social Thought and the College and co-director of the John M. Olin Center for Inquiry into the Theory and Practice of Democracy at the University of Chicago. He taught at Yale, University of Paris, University of Toronto, Tel Aviv University, and Cornell, where he was the recipient of the Clark Teaching Award in 1967. He died in 1992.

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