Metaphysics, Method and Politics: The Political Philosophy of R.G. Collingwood

Front Cover
Imprint Academic, 2003 - Philosophy - 336 pages
0 Reviews

This book argues that R.G. Collingwood developed a complete and coherent political philosophy of civilization. In making this case it also demonstrates that Collingwood's philosophical work comprises a unity in which, although there was development, there is no fundamental discontinuity between his earlier and later writings. A philosophy of civilization must situate its subject matter within the full context of human experience and therefore Collingwood's political philosophy of civilization must be situated within the context of his whole philosophy. The book presents the case that Collingwood developed a coherent philosophy of politics and civilization, that this had its roots in both the early and the later work; and that his overall philosophical approach comprises a generally consistent and integrated whole.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Abbreviations
4
Metaphysics and Method a Necessary Unity
55
Absolute Presuppositions
97
The Political Philosophy of Civilization
159
Theory Practice and the Forms of Action 1 Introduction
161
Theory and Practice
162
Collingwoods Political Theory and Practice
177
The Forms of Action
189
Ruling and Being Ruled
223
Punishment
238
The Law and Morality
250
Conclusion
261
Civilization and Barbarism 1 Introduction
263
Civilization as an Ideal
270
Conclusion
284
The Dimensions of Civilization 1 Introduction
285

Utility
191
Right
195
Duty
199
Conclusion
204
Political Action 1 Introduction
205
The Subject Matter of Political Theory
206
Society
210
The Body Politic
216
The Role of Critical Thinking
287
The Place of Order and Tradition
299
Emotion and the Place of Religion
303
Conclusion
315
Conclusion
317
Bibliography
321
Index
331
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2003)

James Connelly is currently Professor of Political Thought and Head of the School of Human Sciences and Communication at Southampton Institute.

Bibliographic information