A year from a reporter's note-book

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Harper & Brothers, 1898 - Budapest (Hungary) - 304 pages
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Page 148 - ... in the slightest degree, in the promotion of the spirit of fraternal regard which should animate and govern the citizens of every section, state or part of the republic. After the lapse of a century since its utterance, let us at length and forever hereafter heed the admonition of Washington: "There should be no north, no south, no east, no west, but a common country.
Page 87 - You would expect that any man who had been snatched back to life in such a fashion would start and tremble at the reprieve, or would break down altogether, but this boy turned his head steadily, and followed with his eyes the direction of the officer's sword, then nodded his head gravely, and with his shoulders squared, took up a new position, straightened his back again, and once more held himself erect. As an exhibition of self-control this should surely rank above feats of heroism performed in...
Page 87 - ... their rifles, the sword rose, dropped, and the men fired. At the report the Cuban's head snapped back almost between his shoulders, but his body fell slowly, as though some one had pushed him gently forward from behind and he had stumbled. He sank on his side in the wet grass without a struggle or sound, and did not move again.
Page 84 - ... man, walked away behind the firing squad and covered his face with his hands and turned his back. They had both spent the last twelve hours with Rodriguez in the chapel of the prison. The Cuban walked to where the officer directed him to stand, and turned his back to the square and faced the hills and the road across them which led to his father's farm. As the officer gave the first command he straightened himself as far as the cords would allow, and held up his head and fixed his eyes immovably...
Page 80 - A line of tiny camp fires that the sentries had built during the night stretched between the forts at regular intervals and burned brightly. But as the light grew stronger, and the moonlight faded, these were stamped out, and when the soldiers came in force the moon was a white ball in the sky, without radiance, the fires had sunk to ashes, and the sun had not yet risen. So, even when the men were formed into three sides of a hollow square, they were scarcely able to distinguish one another in the...
Page 75 - ... miles outside of Santa Clara, beyond the hills that surround that city to the north. When the revolution broke out young Rodriguez joined the insurgents, leaving his father and mother and two sisters at the farm. He was taken, in December of 1896, by a force of the Guardia...
Page 89 - ... by crowed vigorously and a dozen bugles answered the challenge with the brisk, cheery notes of the reveille, and from all parts of the city the church bells jangled out the call for early mass, and the whole world of Santa Clara seemed to stir and stretch itself and to wake to welcome the day just begun. But as I fell in at the rear of the procession and looked back the figure of the young Cuban, who was no longer a part of the world of Santa Clara, was asleep in the wet grass, with his motionless...
Page 84 - Rodriguez, while probably as willing to give six lives for his country as was the American rebel, being only a peasant, did not think to say so, and he will not, in consequence, live in bronze during the lives of many men, but will be remembered only as one of thirty Cubans, one of whom was shot at Santa Clara on each succeeding day at sunrise. The officer had given the order, the men had raised their pieces, and the condemned man had heard the clicks of the triggers as they were pulled back, and...
Page 140 - American citizens that he had sworn to protect. A few foolish people attended the inauguration exercises and went away disappointed. This was not because the exercises were not of interest, but for the reason that the visitors saw them from the wrong point of view. They apparently expected to find in the inauguration of the president of a republic the same glitter and display that they had witnessed in state ceremonies in Europe. And by looking for pomp and rigid etiquette and officialism, they missed...
Page 83 - It seems a petty thing to have been pleased with at such a time, but I confess to have felt a thrill of satisfaction when I saw, as the Cuban passed me, that he held a cigarette between his lips, not arrogantly nor with bravado, but with the nonchalance of a man who meets his punishment fearlessly, and who will let his enemies see that they can kill but cannot frighten him.

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