Genealogies of the Raymond Families of New England, 1630-1 to 1886: With a Historical Sketch of Some of the Raymonds of Early Times, Their Origin, Etc

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Press of J.J. Little & Company, 1886 - 298 pages
 

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Page 243 - ... however, made no progress in his reluctant task ; a year passed on, and heresy flourished as before, notwithstanding some warlike demonstrations against it, in semblance at least on his part. Castelnau, who watched him with the eye of a vulture following the caterer of his destined repast of blood, could not brook his tardy movements ; he sought Raymond out, at St. Gilles, where he was engaged on some expedition, and bitterly reproached him, as a hypocrite, a heretic, a traitor, and whatsoever...
Page 250 - ... excommunication, and therefore naturally looked to as preparing to defend himself and his subjects from the aggressor, application was made to him for further supplies by the garrison of Lavaur ; but the -wretched man ventured not to afford them. At the same time the infamous bishop of the place, Fouquet, assembled the members of his own communion, and in a fiery harangue represented to them the vengeance they were bringing down on themselves by continuing so far undistinguished from the heretics...
Page 261 - ... granted him, as a fief, for the remainder of his life, a part only of what he had taken from him, namely, a portion of the dioceses of Toulouse, of Albigeois, and of Quercy, with the entire dioceses of Agenois and of Rouergue. These provinces, which the king restored to him, were, moreover, to form the portion of his daughter Jane, then nine years of age, whom he named his sole heiress, and whom he engaged to deliver immediately into the hands of Blanche, that she might bring her up under her...
Page 260 - ... eating its way through the abandoned body. Raymond VII. made the best terms he could ; and they were sufficiently hard. Among them, he obliged himself to raze their walls, and to fill up the formidable ditches of Toulouse, rendering it incapable of ever presenting a defensive front to any assailant ; while a French garrison, occupying the splendid Narbonnese Castle, would keep strict watch over the proceedings of the citizens. Another article bound him to set a price on the head of every suspected...
Page 258 - ... Louis of France, as a meritorious service before God ; and very many were the lives sacrificed of those whom we cannot number with the saints, the objects of the war made by the Beast, in the person of Innocent III. The castle of Marmaude was an important post, and to this the crusaders laid siege, until the inhabitants offered to capitulate, and Prince Louis willingly granted them permission to leave the place in safety, rejecting the counsel of the Bishop of Saintes, that he should seize, burn,...
Page 243 - ... the church where they had all attended morning mass, on the day after their first rencounter, the Toulousian engaged Castelnau in a disputation on the subject of heresy and its due punishment. The fiery zealot on one hand, and on the other a young soldier who had so recently witnessed the insult put upon his princely commander, and heard the interdict pronounced which involved in its deadly evil his own homestead, his own kin, and his familiar friends, were not likely to debate the point with...
Page 247 - ... inaccessible, stood the magnificent castle of Minerva, or Menerbe, famed no less for its natural strength than for the courage and fidelity of its lord, Giraud, one of the bravest and most loyal knights owning fealty to the viscount of Carcassonne. To Raymond Roger he had been ardently attached ; and now that the grave had closed over that champion of the oppressed, Giraud indignantly rejected the assumed authority of his murderer, and held the castle as a duteous vassal of Raymond Trencavel,...
Page 258 - ... and apostates. But what the French prince could not bring himself to perpetrate, was done by hands more experienced in the work of treachery and slaughter. While a few of the principal chiefs and knights were going through the form of surrendering themselves in the tent of Louis, Amaury de Montfort at the head of his troops, privately entered the unguarded city, where of five thousand inhabitants, of all ages and conditions, they left not one alive. Every man, woman and child, was butchered before...
Page 243 - ... elicited from him a promise that he would proceed to the work of separation and extermination, pointed out as the sole price of such mercy as the Romish church assumes to dispense in spiritual matters ; between which and the deadliest vengeance that she has temporal power to inflict, she knows no medium. Raymond, however, made no progress in his reluctant task ; a year passed on, and heresy flourished as before, notwithstanding some warlike demonstrations against it, in semblance at least on...

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