Ars Quatuor Coronatorum: Being the Transactions of the Quatuor Coronati Lodge No. 2076, London, Volume 7

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W. J. Parre H, Limited, 1894
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Page 146 - Universal History, the history of what man has accomplished in this world, is at bottom the History of the Great Men who have worked here.
Page 135 - From the building of the first Temple at Jerusalem to the Babylonish captivity, Freemasons' Lodges were dedicated to King Solomon; from thence to the coming of the Messiah, they were dedicated to Zerubbabel...
Page 183 - A Vade Mecum for Malt Worms, or a Guide to Good Fellows, being a description of the Manners and Customs of the most Eminent Publick Houses in and about the Cities of London and Westminster, with a Hint on the Props or Principal Customers of each House in a Method so plain that any Thirsty Person (of the meanest capacity) may easily find the nearest Way from one House to Another. Dedicated to the Brewers.
Page 168 - You hear that boy laughing? You think he's all fun. But the angels laugh, too, at the good he has done. The children laugh loud as they troop to his call. And the poor man that knows him laughs loudest of all.
Page 134 - The son of a woman of the daughters of Dan, and his father was a man of Tyre, skilful to work in gold, and in silver, in brass, in iron, in stone, and in timber, in purple, in blue, and in fine linen, and in crimson; also to grave any manner of graving, and to find out every device which shall be put to him, with thy cunning men, and with the cunning men of my lord David thy father.
Page 182 - Sayer, Grand Master, commanded the Masters and Wardens of Lodges to meet the Grand Officers every Quarter in Communication, at the Place that he should appoint in the Summons sent by the Tyler.
Page 56 - Treatise displayeing the Chiefe Curiosities as they are in Use among diverse of the People of Scotland to this Day ; — Singularities for the most Part peculiar to that Nation.
Page 83 - MERRY are the bells, and merry would they ring, Merry was myself, and merry could I sing; With a merry ding-dong, happy, gay, and free, And a merry sing-song, happy let us be! ' Waddle goes your gait, and hollow are your hose: Noddle goes your pate, and purple is your nose: Merry is your sing-song, happy, gay, and free; With a merry ding-dong, happy let us be! Merry have we met, and merry have we been; Merry let us part, and merry meet again; With our merry sing-song, happy, gay, and free, With a...
Page 158 - Rutherford, eldest daughter of Dr John Rutherford, professor of medicine in the University of Edinburgh. He was one of those pupils of Boerhaave, to whom the school of medicine in our northern metropolis owes its rise, and a man distinguished for professional talent, for lively wit, and for literary acquirements. Dr Rutherford was twice married. His first wife, of whom my mother is the sole surviving child, was a daughter of Sir John Swinton of...
Page 134 - Huram my father's, the son of a woman of the daughters of Dan, and his father was a man of Tyre, skilful to work in gold and in silver, in brass, in iron, in stone, and in timber, in purple, in blue, and in fine linen, and in crimson ; also to grave any manner of graving, and to find out every device which shall be put to him...

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