Reading History in Early Modern England

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This book focuses on the 'after-life' of historical texts in the period between the arrival of printing in England and the early eighteenth century. Whereas previous studies of historical writing during this period have focused on their authors and on their style or methodology, this work examines the history book from a number of other perspectives. The intent is to situate the study of history books within the current literature on the history of the book and the history of print culture. After discussing the process whereby the inheritance of the medieval chronicle was broken down into a variety of different historical genres during the sixteenth century, the author turns to the questions of how and why history books were read, who owned them, the borrowing and lending of them, their production and printing, and methods for marketing and distributing them.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The death of the chronicle
11
The contexts and purposes of history reading
79
The ownership of historical works
132
Borrowing and lending
168
Clio unbound and bound
203
Marketing history
255
Conclusion
318
A booksellers inventory in history books ca 1730 evidence from Folger MS Add 923
327
History by auction an analysis of select auction sale catalogs 16861700
346
Index
353
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Daniel Woolf is Professor of History at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada where he has also served as Vice-Chancellor and Principal since 2009. He previously held professorial and administrative posts at the University of Alberta (2002-2009), McMaster University (1999-2002) and Dalhousie University (1987-1999). He holds a BA from Queen's University and a D.Phil. from Oxford University. Professor Woolf is the author or editor of several books and many scholarly articles and book chapters. He has published A Global History of History with Cambridge University Press and is also general editor of the five-volume Oxford History of Historical Writing.

Daniel Woolf is Professor of History at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada where he has also served as Vice-Chancellor and Principal since 2009. He previously held professorial and administrative posts at the University of Alberta (2002-2009), McMaster University (1999-2002) and Dalhousie University (1987-1999). He holds a BA from Queen's University and a D.Phil. from Oxford University. Professor Woolf is the author or editor of several books and many scholarly articles and book chapters. He has published A Global History of History with Cambridge University Press and is also general editor of the five-volume Oxford History of Historical Writing.

Born in Australia in 1949, John Guy grew up in England. Early in life Guy developed a love of history. He pursued that interest and read History under the supervision of Professor Sir Geoffrey Elton, the pre-eminent Tudor scholar of the late-twentieth century. John Guy took a First and became a Research Fellow of Selwyn College in 1970. Awarded a Greene Cup by Clare College in 1970, he completed his PhD on Cardinal Wolsey in 1973 and won the Yorke Prize of the University of Cambridge in 1976. John Guy has lectured extensively on Early Modern British History and Renaissance Political Thought in both Britain and the United States. He has published 16 books and numerous academic articles. Guy's book My Heart is My Own: the life of Mary Queen of Scots (Harper Perennial, 2004) won the 2004 Whitbread Biography Award, the Marsh Biography Award, was a finalist in the USA for the 2004 Biography/Autobiography of the Year Award (National Books Critics' Circle), and has been translated into Spanish and Czech. Other books include Thomas More (Hodder Arnold, 2000), and The Tudors: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 1990). For over twenty years he was co-editor of the acclaimed academic series Cambridge Studies in Early Modern British History; and co-author of The Reign of Elizabeth I: Court and Culture in the Last Decade (Cambridge University Press, 1995) and contributed to The Oxford History of Britain, The Oxford Illustrated History of Britain, The Oxford Illustrated History of Tudor and Stuart Britain, and The Oxford History of the British Isles: the Sixteenth Century.