Complete Letter Writer; Containig a Great Variety of Letters on the Following Subjects: Relationship, Business, Love, Courtship and Marriage, Friendship, and Miscellaneous Letters, Law Forms, Etc

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Marion & Hitchcock, 1853
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Page 112 - We thus enter the bowers of ease, and repose in the shades of security. Here the heart softens, and vigilance subsides; we are then willing to inquire whether another advance cannot be made, and whether we may not, at least, turn our eyes upon the gardens of pleasure; we approach them with scruple...
Page 138 - And to quit and deliver up the premises to the lessor, or its attorney, peaceably and quietly, at the end of the term, in as good order and condition, reasonable use and wearing thereof, fire and other unavoidable casualties excepted, as the same now are...
Page 136 - He shall not waste the goods of his said Master nor lend them unlawfully to any...
Page 115 - As for you, my good friend, I think, since our first acquaintance, there have not been any of those little suspicions or jealousies that often affect the sincerest friendships; I am sure not on my side. I must be so sincere as to own that, though I could not help...
Page 137 - Massachusetts, yeoman, the receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge, do hereby give, grant, sell and convey to the said...
Page 113 - We entangle ourselves in business, immerge ourselves in luxury, and rove through the labyrinths of inconstancy, till the darkness of old age begins to invade us, and disease and anxiety obstruct our way. We then look back upon our lives with horror, with sorrow, with repentance ; and wish, but too often vainly wish, that we had not forsaken the ways of virtue.
Page 128 - Be studious in your profession, and you will be learned. Be industrious and frugal, and you will be rich. Be sober and temperate, and you will be healthy. Be in general virtuous, and you will be happy. At least, you will, by such conduct, stand the best chance for such consequences.
Page 113 - ... yet remains one effort to be made; that reformation is never hopeless, nor sincere endeavors ever unassisted, that the wanderer may at length return after all his errors, and that he who implores strength and courage from above, shall find danger and difficulty give way before him. Go now, my son, to thy repose, commit thyself to the care of Omnipotence, and when the morning calls again to toil, begin anew thy journey and thy life.
Page 32 - I rather advise might be by a new gift and creation from himself, than by any other means, to the end you may pay the thanks to him without having obligation to any other.
Page 112 - We then relax our vigour, and resolve no longer to be terrified with crimes at a distance, but rely upon our own constancy, and venture to approach what we resolve never to touch.

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