A History of the Ninth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry

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J.S. Clark, printer, 1864 - United States - 95 pages
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Page 41 - ... could not shoot us for fear of being shot themselves. Our men were in the same predicament. Only five or six were on the wall, and thirty or forty in and around the ditch. Catesby, my companion, is on the wall beside me. A man within two feet of me put his head cautiously up to shoot into the fort, but suddenly dropped his musket, and his brains were dashed in a stream over my fine coat, which I had in my arms. Several were killed and rolled down the embankment. This was done by a regiment of...
Page 41 - Looking to the right or left I saw several brigades charging at the same time — what a sight ! I saw men running at full speed, stop suddenly and fall on their faces, with their brains scattered all around ; others with legs or arms cut off. I gave myself to God, and got ahead of my company. The ground was literally strewed with mangled corpses. One ball passed through my pants and cut twigs close by me. It seemed that by holdingout my hand I could have caught a dozen bullets.
Page 42 - Trim prisoner. The men were falling ten at a time. The ditch being full, and finding that we had no chance, we, the survivors, tried to save ourselves as best we could. I was so far up I could not get off quickly ; I do not recollect seeing Catesby after this, but think he got off before. I trust in God he has. I and Captain Foster started together, and the air was literally tilled with hissing balls.
Page 42 - ... God!" jumped about two feet off the ground and fell on his face. The top of his head seemed to cave in, and the blood spirted straight up several feet. I could see men falling as they attempted to run ; some with their heads blown to pieces and others with the blood streaming from their backs. Oh! it was horrible. One poor fellow being almost on me, told me his name, and asked me to take his pocketbook...
Page 42 - God he has. 1 and Captain Foster started together, and the air was literally filled with hissing balls. I got about twenty steps as quick as I could, about a dozen being killed in that distance. I fell down and crawled behind a large stump. Just then I saw poor Foster throw up his hands and saying "Oh! my God!
Page 41 - ... bombardment, I led the company all the time. I went skirmishing at seven-and-a-half and returned at nine-and-a-half. Two of Captain Foster's men were killed, but none of ours. The enemy fired very fast. "We got behind trees and logs, and the way bullets did fly was unpleasant to see. I think twenty must have passed within a few feet of me humming prettily. Shells tore off large limbs, and splinters struck my tree several times. We could only move from tree to tree by bending low to the ground...
Page 42 - ... four feet from me ; one was so near it struck me and burnt my face with powder. The grape-shot knocked large pieces from my stump ; it was gradually wearing away. I endured the horrors of death here for one-half hour. Our troops formed in line and advanced a second time to the charge with cheers, but began firing when about half way, and I had to endure it all. I feigned death. I was between our own and the enemy's fire. In the first charge our men did not fire a gun, but charged across the ditch...
Page 42 - put down the flag," when it was lowered or shot into the ditch. Oh ! we were butchered like dogs— for we were not supported. Some one placed a white handkerchief on Sergeant Buck's musket, and he took it to a port hole, but the Yankees snatched it off and took him prisoner. The men were falling ten at a time. The ditch being full, and finding that we had no chance, we, the survivors, tried to...
Page 41 - ... grape, canister, cannon and minie balls. Oh ! God. I never saw the like. The men fell like grass. Giving one tremendous cheer we dashed to the bottom of the hill on which the fortifications are situated. Here we found every foot of ground covered with large trees and brush. Looking to the right or left I saw several brigades charging at the same time — what a sight ! I saw men running at full speed, stop suddenly and fall on their faces, with their brains scattered all around ; others with...
Page 42 - ... it was horrible. One poor fellow being almost on me, told me his name, and asked me to take his pocketbook, and if I escaped to give it to his mother and tell her that he died like a brave man. I asked him if he was a Christian ; he said he was. I asked him to pray, which he did with the cannons thundering a deadly accompaniment. Poor fellow, I forgot his request in the- excitement. His legs were literally cut to pieces. As our men retreated the enemy poured into us a terrific fire. I was hardly...

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