The gardeners dictionary, Volume 2

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1835
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Page 303 - And one went out into the field to gather herbs, and found a wild vine, and gathered thereof wild gourds his lap full, and came and shred them into the pot of pottage: for they knew them not.
Page 347 - whether the Indians can so prepare the stupifying herb datura, that they make it lie several days, months, or years, according as they will have it, in a man's body, and at the end kill him, without missing half an hour's time ?' " Beverly, in his History of Virginia, gives a very circumstantial account of the effects of stramonium.
Page 347 - ... and another stark naked was sitting up in a corner, like a monkey, grinning and making mows at them...
Page 39 - ... into those eastern countries; and upon knowledge and experience of the said Garway's continued care and industry in obtaining the best tea, and making drink thereof, very many noblemen, physicians, merchants, and gentlemen of quality, have ever since sent to him for the said leaf, and daily resort to his house in Exchange Alley, aforesaid, to drink the drink thereof...
Page 39 - Tea in England hath been sold in the leaf for six pounds, and sometimes for ten pounds the pound weight, and in respect of its former scarceness and dearness it hath been only used as a regalia in high treatments and entertainments, and presents made thereof to princes and grandees till the year 1657.
Page 344 - Withering to think of giving it in a case of difficulty of swallowing, seemingly occasioned by a paralytic affection. The patient was directed to chew a thin slice of the root as often as she could bear it, .and in about a month recovered her power of swallowing.
Page 180 - The cassia bud of commerce is not the produce of the laurus cassia, but is the fleshy hexangular receptacle of the seed of the laurus cinnamomum. When gathered young, the receptacle completely envelopes the embryo seed, which progressively protrudes but continues firmly embraced by the receptacle. The buds are of various sizes, having the appearance of nails with roundish heads. If carefully dried the receptacle is nearly black. These buds are not prepared in Ceylon. A rather elevated situation is...
Page 347 - Bacon; and some of them eat plentifully of it, the effect of which was a very pleasant comedy; for they turned natural fools upon it for several days: one would blow up a feather in the air; another would dart straws at it with much fury; and another stark naked was sitting up in a corner, like a monkey...
Page 184 - Plants of several year's growth sometimes bear numerous marks of annual experiments made for the purpose of ascertaining whether the bark was in a favourable situation for removal. The shoots which are cut are usually from a half to three-quarters of an inch in diameter, and from three to five feet long. Some travellers in former times asserted that the cinnamon was peeled from the tree while standing, and that nature provided the decorticated plant with a new bark. It is said that the experiment...
Page 184 - ... of removing the cuticle. After being subjected to this treatment, the interior side of each section of bark is placed upon a convex piece of wood, and the epidermis, together with the greenish pulpy matter immediately under it, is carefully scraped off with a curved knife. This is an operation requiring some nicety, for if any of the outer bark be allowed to remain, it gives an unpleasant bitterness to the cinnamon. In a few hours after the removal of the cuticle, the pieces are put one into...

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