The Life of Henry Clay, the Great American Statesman: Embracing an Account of His Early and Domestic History, His Moral and Religious Sentiments, His Personal and Professional Qualities, His Views Upon the Great Questions of His Time, His General Political Character and Career, and the Influence He Exerted Upon the Nation as a Patriot and Statesman, Together with the Closing Scenes of His Life, Volume 2

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A. S. Barnes & Company, 1855
 

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Page 118 - Resolved, That the President, in the late Executive proceedings in relation to the public revenue, has assumed upon himself authority and power not conferred by the Constitution and laws, but in derogation of both.
Page 309 - Besides the probate, large fees are demanded for burying him in the chancel ; his virtues are handed down to posterity on taxed marble ; and he is then gathered to his fathers, — to be taxed no more.
Page 19 - The Congress, the Executive and the Court must each for itself be guided by its own opinion of the Constitution. Each public officer who takes an oath to support the Constitution swears that he will support it as he understands it, and not as it is understood by others.
Page 309 - The school-boy whips his taxed top — the beardless youth manages his taxed horse, with a taxed bridle on a taxed road ; — and the dying Englishman pouring his medicine, which has paid seven per cent.
Page 72 - ... branches thereof may be established, shall be made in said bank or branches thereof, unless the Secretary of the Treasury shall at any time otherwise order and direct; in which case the Secretary of the Treasury shall immediately lay before Congress, if in session, and if not, immediately after the commencement of the next session, the reasons of such order or direction.
Page 71 - By the Constitution of the United States the President is invested with certain important political powers, in the exercise of which he is to use his own discretion, and is accountable only to his country in his political character, and to his own conscience. To aid him in the performance of these duties, he is authorized to appoint certain officers who act by his authority and in conformity with his orders.
Page 252 - ... laid for the purpose of raising such revenue as may be necessary to an economical administration of the Government...
Page 249 - Yes, I have ambition ; but it is the ambition of being the humble instrument, in the hands of Providence, to reconcile a divided people — once more to revive concord and harmony in a distracted land — the pleasing ambition of contemplating the glorious spectacle of a free, united, prosperous, and fraternal people!
Page 71 - The conclusion from this reasoning is that, where the heads of departments are the political or confidential agents of the executive, merely to execute the will of the President, or rather to act in cases In which the executive possesses a constitutional or legal discretion, nothing can be more perfectly clear than that their acts are only politically examlnable.
Page 43 - I know that I can not expect to perform the arduous task with equal ability and success. But united as I have been in his counsels, a daily witness of his exclusive and unsurpassed devotion to his country's welfare, agreeing with him in sentiments which his countrymen have warmly supported, and permitted to partake largely of his confidence, I may hope that somewhat of the same cheering approbation will be found to attend upon my path.

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