The Oxford Guide to Heraldry

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 1990 - Emblemas - 233 pages
0 Reviews
The fascinating art of heraldry, with its special rules and methods, its system of symbols denoting prominent families and institutions, and its display of pageantry, has intrigued people for centuries. Evidence of it exists throughout Europe on everything from stained glass to pub signs.
Lavishly illustrated with color and black and white plates, The Oxford Guide to Heraldry offers a delightful tour of the heart of medieval pagentry. The only guide to heraldry written entirely by Officers of Arms with full access to the College of Arms Library (which contains the most important heraldic records and manuscripts in the world), this beautiful, enriching volume covers the origins of heraldry, the composition of arms and their visual appearance, the use of arms as decoration, how and why arms are granted, and to whom, and much more. It also explains how coats of arms have differed from country to country, with informative sections on France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and other European nations, plus a complete chapter devoted to heraldry in America. This authoritative volume is an invaluable reference for anyone interested in genealogy, history, chivalry, or the decorative arts.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

About the author (1990)


About the Authors:
Thomas Woodcock is Somerset Herald. He is the joint editor of the Dictionary of British Arms.
John Martin Robinson is Fitzalan Pursuivant Extraordinary and the author of several books, including The Dukes of Norfolk and The National Trust Book of English Country Estate.

Bibliographic information