The Sound Book: The Science of the Sonic Wonders of the World

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W. W. Norton & Company, Feb 10, 2014 - Science - 304 pages
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“A lucid and passionate case for a more mindful way of listening. . . . Anyone who has ever clapped, hollered or yodeled at an echo will delight in [Cox’s] zestful curiosity.”—New York Times

Trevor Cox is on a hunt for the sonic wonders of the world. A renowned expert who engineers classrooms and concert halls, Cox has made a career of eradicating bizarre and unwanted sounds. But after an epiphany in the London sewers, Cox now revels in exotic noises—creaking glaciers, whispering galleries, stalactite organs, musical roads, humming dunes, seals that sound like alien angels, and a Mayan pyramid that chirps like a bird. With forays into archaeology, neuroscience, biology, and design, Cox explains how sound is made and altered by the environment, how our body reacts to peculiar noises, and how these mysterious wonders illuminate sound’s surprising dynamics in everyday settings—from your bedroom to the opera house. The Sound Book encourages us to become better listeners in a world dominated by the visual and to open our ears to the glorious cacophony all around us.
 

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THE SOUND BOOK: The Science of the Sonic Wonders of the World

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Cox (Acoustic Engineering/Salford Univ.; Acoustic Absorbers and Diffusers, 2009) explores how the psychological and physical worlds of sound come together.Using the design of concert halls to ... Read full review

Contents

Prologue
The Most Reverberant Place in the World
Ringing Rocks
Barking Fish
Echoes of the Past
Going round the Bend
Singing Sands
The Quietest Places in the World
Placing Sound
Future Wonders
Acknowledgments
Notes
Index
Copyright

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About the author (2014)

A professor of acoustic engineering, Trevor Cox has appeared on the Discovery and National Geographic channels, produced seventeen BBC radio documentaries, and holds the Guinness Record for discovering the world's "Longest Echo." He lives in Manchester, England.

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