Letters on England

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Cassell, 1894 - English literature - 192 pages
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User Review  - asukamaxwell - LibraryThing

I love Voltaire, always have. Voltaire is humorous, sarcastic and opinionated, and like his other works, there is a unique style that fully captures his character. In this work, he addresses Quakers ... Read full review

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User Review  - HolmesGirl221b - LibraryThing

Voltaire said of England: "If every I smell of a Resurrection, or come a second time on Earth, I will pray to God to make me born in England, the Land of Liberty." In the two years or so he was here ... Read full review

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Page 138 - tis a consummation Devoutly to be wish'd. To die: to sleep; To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come When we have shuffled off this mortal coil...
Page 139 - But that the dread of something after death, — The undiscovered country, from whose bourn No traveller returns, — puzzles the will ; And makes us rather bear those ills we have, Than fly to others that we know not of? Thus conscience does make cowards of us all...
Page 10 - I indeed baptize you with water unto repentance; but he that cometh after me is mightier than I, whose shoes I am not worthy to bear; he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost, and with fire...
Page 138 - The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely, The pangs of despised love, the law's delay, The insolence of office and the spurns That patient merit of the unworthy takes...
Page 169 - For, that sad moment, when the sylphs withdrew, And Ariel weeping from Belinda flew, Umbriel, a dusky, melancholy sprite, As ever sullied the fair face of light, Down to the central earth, his proper scene, Repair'd to search the gloomy cave of Spleen.
Page 42 - If one religion only were allowed in England, the Government would very possibly become arbitrary ; if there were but two, the people would cut one another's throats; but as there are such a multitude, they all live happy and in peace.
Page 141 - tis all a cheat; Yet, fooled with hope, men favour the deceit; Trust on, and think to-morrow will repay: To-morrow's falser than the former day; Lies worse, and, while it says, we shall be blest With some new joys, cuts off what we possest.
Page 169 - And in a vapour reach'd the dismal dome. No cheerful breeze this sullen region knows ; The dreaded east is all the wind that blows. Here in a grotto, shelter'd close from air, And screen'd in shades from day's detested glare, She sighs for ever on her pensive bed, Pain at her side, and Megrim at her head.
Page 191 - Heavens, The Story of the. By Sir ROBERT STAWELL BALL, LL.D., FRS With Coloured Plates and Wood Engravings.
Page 138 - tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune Or to take arms against a sea of troubles And by opposing end them ? To die to sleep...

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