An Essay on the Credibility of Swedenborg: In which His Claims as the Announcer of the Dispensation Mentioned in Prophecy Under the Figure of the New Jerusalem, are Briefly Considered and Defended

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J.S. Hodson, 1828 - New Jerusalem Church - 75 pages
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Page 51 - Queen had not left her apartment called the white room, where she was conversing with her maids of honor and other ladies of the court. Swedenborg did not wait for the Queen's coming out, but entered directly into her apartment, and whispered in her ear. The Queen, struck with astonishment, was taken ill, and did not recover herself for some time. After she was come to herself, she said to those about her, ' There is only God and my brother who can know what he has just told me...
Page 46 - ... amongst other things told him, that the water in his country, would sometimes, in cold weather, be so hard, that men walked upon it, and that it would bear an elephant, if he were there. To which the king replied, hitherto I have believed the strange things you have told me, because I look upon you as a sober fair man, but now I am sure you lie.
Page 53 - Swedenborg has related to me respecting my deceased acquaintances, both friends and enemies, and the secrets that were between us, almost surpasses belief. He explained to me in what manner the peace was concluded between Sweden and the king of Prussia ; and he praised my conduct on that occasion : he even told me who were the three great personages of whom I made use in that affair ; which, nevertheless, was an entire secret between them and me. I asked him how he could be informed of such particulars,...
Page 17 - Now when he was in Jerusalem at the passover, in the feast day, many believed in his name, when they saw the miracles which he did. But Jesus did not commit himself unto them, because he knew all men, and needed not that any should testify of man, for he knew what was in man.
Page 50 - She added, that she nearly fainted at the shock she experienced : and she called on M. de Schwerin to answer for the truth of what she had said ; who, in his laconic style, contented himself with saying, ' All you have said, madam, is perfectly true — at least as far as I am concerned.' " I ought to add," M. Thiebault continues, " that though the Queen laid great stress on the truth of her recital, she professed herself at the same time incredulous to Swedenborg's supposed conferences with the...
Page 50 - You took, madam, your last leave of the Prince of Prussia, your late august brother, at Chariot tenburg, on such a day, and at such an hour of the afternoon; as you were passing afterwards through the long gallery, in the castle of Charlottenburg, you met him again ; he then took you by the hand, and led you to such a window, where you could not be overheard, and then said to you these words...
Page 59 - These are found interspersed in various parts of his manuscripts, and are as follows: 1. Often to read and meditate on the Word of the Lord. 2. To submit everything to the will of Divine Providence. 3. To observe in everything a propriety of behaviour, and always to keep the conscience clear. 4. To discharge with fidelity the functions of his employment, and the duties of his office, and to render himself in all things useful to society.
Page 49 - I know not on what occasion it was, that, conversing one day with the Queen on the subject of the celebrated visionary, Swedenborg, we (the members of the academy) expressed a desire, particularly M. Merian and myself, to know what opinion was entertained of him in Sweden. I on my part related what had been told me respecting him by Chamberlain d'Hamon, who was still alive, and who had been ambassador from Prussia both to Holland and France. It was, ' that his brother-in-law (the Count...
Page 50 - ... that M. Swedenborg, having come one evening to her court, she had taken him aside and begged him to inform himself of her deceased brother, the Prince Royal of Prussia, what he said to her at the moment of her taking leave of him for the Court of Stockholm. She added, that what she had said was of a nature to render it impossible that the Prince could have repeated it to any one, nor had it ever escaped her own lips...
Page 50 - ... few days Swedenborg informed her, that her deceased husband had taken the shopkeeper's receipt for the money on such a day, at such an hour, as he was reading such an article in Bayle's Dictionary in his cabinet; and that his attention being called immediately afterwards to some other concern, he had put the receipt into the book to mark the place at which he left off; where in fact it was found, at the page described...

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