Studies in Mughal History

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Motilal Banarsidass Publ., 1983 - India - 227 pages
Descendents of two great warriors of Central Asia-Taimur and Chingiz Khan, The Mughals have become a legend in history of the world. Their rule in India heralded a new era of far-reaching socio-political changes making for an enlightenment of a sort that calls for an evergrowing scholarship to grasp its many-faceted significance. The monograph in hand is not just a mere addition to the numerous works on the Mughals and their activities in various fields. Being the result of a deep and critical scholarly study of the various Political and Religious aspects of the doings of the Mughals it comes up as a unique approach to the subject. Here is an attempt to study Mughal history from a new angle.
 

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Page 22 - My years have gone by profitless. God has been in my heart, yet my darkened eyes have not recognized his light.
Page 32 - Hindustan, and as these several countries had once been held by the Turks, I pictured them as my own, and was resolved to get them into my own hands, whether peacefully or by force. For these reasons it being imperative to treat the hillmen well, this order was given : Do no hurt or harm to the flocks and herds of these people, nor even to their cotton ends and broken needles'.
Page 32 - As it was always in my heart to possess Hindustan," writes Babur, "and as these several countries had once been held by the Turks, I pictured them as my own, and was resolved to get them into my hands, whether peacefully or by force. For these reasons, it being imperative to treat the hillmen well, this order was given: do not hurt or harm flocks and herds of these people, nor even to their cotton-ends and broken needles.
Page 14 - Firdaus rue zamtn ast — hamin ast to, hamin ast to, hamin ast (If there is a paradise on earth it is this, it is this, it is this).
Page 126 - The advice of my father with difficulty kept me back from outbreaks of folly; my mind had no rest, and my heart felt itself drawn to the sages of Mongolia or to the hermits on Lebanon; I longed for interviews with the lamas of Tibet or with the padris of Portugal, and I would gladly sit with the priests of the Parsis and the learned of the Zendavesta.
Page 82 - Eighty thousand horses, seven Rajas of the highest rank, nine Raos, and one hundred and four chieftains bearing the titles of Rawul and Rawut, with five hundred war elephants, followed him into the field. The princes of Marwar and Amber did him homage, and the Raos of Gwalior, Ajmer, Sikri, Raisen, Kalpek, Chanderi, Bundi, Gagraon, Rampura, and Abu, served him as tributaries or held of him in fief.
Page 133 - ... one and all with the great advantage of not losing what is good in any one religion, while gaining whatever is better in another. In that way honour would be rendered to God, peace would be given to the peoples, and security to the Empire.
Page 189 - Ruinous as the Afghan war was to the imperial finances, its political effect was even more harmful. It made the employment of the Afghans in the ensuing Rajput war impossible, though the Afghans were just the class of soldiers who could have won victory in that rugged and barren country. Moreover, it relieved the pressure on Shivaji by draining the Deccan of the best Mughal troops for service on the north-west frontier. The Maratha Chief took advantage of this division of his enemy's strength to...
Page 47 - All; and if at any time they were displeased with him, he tried so hard to pacify them that he would himself go to their houses, ungird his sword from his waist, and place it before the offended party: nay, he would sometimes even take off his turban from his head and solicit forgiveness, saying 'If you think me unworthy of the station I occupy, choose some one else, and bestow on me some other office.
Page 32 - Possession of this country by a Turk has come down from of old; beware not to bring ruin on its people by giving way to fear or anxiety; our eye is on this land and on this people; raid and rapine shall not be.

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