Introduction to the English Reader, Or A Selection of Pieces: In Prose and Poetry ... To Which, by the Aid of a Key, is Scrupulously Applied Mr. Walker's Pronunciation ...

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Lincoln & Edmands, 1831 - 168 pages
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Page 147 - And an immortal crown. 2 A cloud of witnesses around Hold thee in full survey ; Forget the steps already trod, And onward urge thy way. 3...
Page 86 - I voluntarily offered him all my money for one. I then came home, and went whistling all over the house, much pleased with my whistle, but disturbing all the family. My brothers, and sisters; and cousins, understanding the bargain I had made, told me I had given four times as much for it as it was worth. This put me in mind what good things I might have bought with the rest of the money ; and they laughed at me so much for my folly, that I cried with. vexation, and the reflection gave me more chagrin...
Page 108 - Nor love thy life, nor hate; but what thou liv'st Live well; how long or short, permit to Heaven: And now prepare thee for another sight.
Page 138 - And labours hard to store it well With the sweet food she makes. In works of labour or of skill I would be busy too: For Satan finds some mischief still For idle hands to do. In books, or work, or healthful play Let my first years be past, That I may give for every day Some good account at last.
Page 130 - HAPPY the man, whose wish and care A few paternal acres bound, Content to breathe his native air, In his own ground. Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread, Whose flocks supply him with attire ; Whose trees in summer yield him shade, In winter fire.
Page 150 - O may these thoughts possess my breast, ' Where'er I rove, where'er I rest ! ' Nor let my weaker passions dare 'Consent to sin, for God is there.
Page 134 - The young who labour and the old who rest. Is any sick ? the Man of Ross relieves, Prescribes, attends, the med'cine makes and gives. Is there a variance ? enter but his door, Balk'd are the courts, and contest is no more ; Despairing quacks with curses fled the place, And vile attorneys, now a useless race.
Page 131 - Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread, Whose flocks supply him with attire ; Whose trees in summer yield him shade, In winter, fire. Blest, who can unconcern'dly find Hours, days, and years, slide soft away In health of body; peace of mind; Quiet by day; Sound sleep by night; study and ease Together mix'd; sweet recreation, And innocence, which most does please With meditation.
Page 134 - Or in proud falls magnificently lost, But clear and artless, pouring through the plain Health to the sick, and solace to the swain. Whose causeway parts the vale with shady rows ? Whose seats the weary traveller repose ? Who tanght that heaven-directed spire to rise ? ' The Man of Ross,
Page 134 - But clear and artless, pouring through the plain, Health to the sick, and solace to the swain. Whose causeway parts the vale with shady rows ? Whose seats the weary traveller repose ? Who taught that Heaven-directed spire to rise ? " The Man of Ross," each lisping babe replies. Behold the Market-place, with poor o'erspread, The Man of Ross...

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