Football for Public and Player

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Frederick A. Stokes compnay, 1913 - Football - 242 pages
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Page 21 - the practical adaptation of the means placed at a general's disposal to the attainment of the object in view...
Page 45 - There is a soul to an army as well as to the individual man, and no general can accomplish the full work of his army unless he commands the soul of his men, as well as their bodies and legs.
Page 204 - A safety is made when the ball in possession of a player guarding his own goal is declared dead by the Referee, any part of it being on, above or behind the goal line, provided the impetus which caused it to pass from outside the goal line to or behind the goal line was given by the side defending the goal. Such impetus could come from : "A kick, pass, snapback or fumble by one of the player's own side.
Page 205 - ... (2) from a kick which bounded back from an opponent; (3) in case a player carrying the ball is forced back, provided the ball was not declared dead by the referee before the line was reached or crossed. A safety is also made when a player of the side in possession of the ball commits a foul which would give the ball to the opponents behind the offender's goal line...
Page 16 - ... resemblance and presses it home. As he says, "The art of football constantly aspires to the condition of warfare," stipulating, however, that this statement is made in an academic spirit. Having due regard for certain fundamental differences between the great game and its more sinister counterpart, he says: "Even the history of football bears a striking resemblance to the history of warfare. Both, in the beginning, were rooted in individualism ; both went through that stage and emerged into the...
Page 205 - Such impetus could come: (i) from a kick, pass, snap-back or fumble by one of the player's own side; (2) from a kick which bounded back from an opponent; (3) in case a player carrying the ball is forced back, provided the ball was not declared dead by the referee before the line was reached or crossed.
Page 205 - ... when the ball, kicked by a man behind his goal line, crosses the side line extended behind the goal line.
Page 8 - 80, 112,158, nearly all Protestants. B. is divided into the old and the new town— the former on the right, the latter on the left side of the river, which is spanned by four bridges. The ramparts and bastions round the old town have been leveled, and formed into public promenades, which are laid out with excellent taste.
Page 28 - Nevertheless, well managed columns are the very soul of military operations; in them is the victory, and in them also is safety to be found after a defeat. The secret consists in knowing when and where to extend the front.
Page 16 - ... fire action": in war the long-range use of rifle and field gun, in football the long-range use of the kicking game and the extreme development of the forward pass and individual interference. In both the deadliest arm of the present day was the slowest of development : in war the artillery, in football scientific kicking, handling and covering of kicks. In both the final 'destructive element...

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