The Penny Cyclopædia of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, Volumes 23-24

Front Cover
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 45 - My father was a little smart man, active to the last degree in all exercises, most patient of fatigue and disappointments, of which it pleased God to give him full measure.
Page 187 - ANOTHER source of the sublime is infinity ; if it does not rather belong to the last, (infinity has a tendency to fill the mind with that sort of delightful horror, which is the most genuine effect, and truest test of the sublime.
Page 186 - There are many animals, who though far from being large, are yet capable of raising ideas of the sublime, because they are considered as objects of terror. As serpents and poisonous animals of almost all kinds.
Page 45 - The autumn of that year, or the spring afterwards (I forget which), my father got leave of his colonel to fix me at school, — which he did near Halifax, with an able master ; with whom I stayed some time, till, by God's care of me, my cousin Sterne, of Elvington, became a father to me, and sent me to the university, &c.
Page 147 - Complete View of the Manners, Customs, Arms, Habits, &c., of the Inhabitants of England from the arrival of the Saxons till the Reign of Henry VIII.
Page 144 - Petises, and thought it was a not fullgrown bird of the common sort. It was cooked and eaten before my memory returned. Fortunately the head, neck, legs, wings, many of the larger feathers, and a large part of the skin, had been preserved; and from these a very nearly perfect specimen has been put together, and is now exhibited in the museum of the Zoological Society.
Page 186 - The passions which belong to self-preservation turn on pain and danger; they are simply painful when their causes immediately affect us; they are delightful when we have an idea of pain and danger, without being actually in such circumstances ; this delight I have not called pleasure, because it turns on pain, and because it is different enough from any idea of positive pleasure. Whatever excites this delight, I call sublime.
Page 100 - It was believed by some (upon what ground was never clear enough) that he made that haste then to accuse the lord Say, and some others, of having . induced the Scots to invade the kingdom: but he was scarce entered into the house of peers, when the message from the house of commons was called in, and when Mr. Pym at the bar, and in the name of all the commons of England, impeached Thomas earl of Strafford (with the addition of all his other titles) of high treason...
Page 245 - ... one to the left and the other to the right of the cardiac orifices, analogous to those in the stomach of the Hog.
Page 98 - ... anything of consequence. It was the course that I governed myself by after my father's death, with great advantage to myself and affairs ; and yet my breeding abroad had shown me more of the world than yours hath done, and I had natural reason like other men ; only I confess I did in all things distrust myself, wherein you shall do, as I said, extremely well, if you do so...

Bibliographic information