Basic Neurochemistry: Molecular, Cellular and Medical Aspects

Front Cover
Scott Brady, George Siegel, R. Wayne Albers, Donald Price
Academic Press, Nov 11, 2005 - Medical - 1016 pages
3 Reviews
Basic Neurochemistry: Molecular, Cellular and Medical Aspects, the outstanding and comprehensive classic text on neurochemistry, is now newly updated and revised in its Seventh Edition. This well-established text has been accepted worldwide as a resource for postgraduate trainees and teachers in neurology, psychiatry, and basic neuroscience, as well as for graduate and postgraduate students and instructors in the neurosciences. It is an excellent source of current information on basic biochemical processes in brain function and disease for qualifying examinations and continuing medical education.

All disc-based content for this title is now available on the Web.

· Completely updated with 60% new authors and material, and entirely new chapters
· Over 400 fully revised figures in splendid color
· Accompanying companion website with all the figures and figure legends - perfect for slides, presentations, and handouts
 

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Review: Basic Neurochemistry: Molecular, Cellular and Medical Aspects [With CDROM]

User Review  - Goodreads

An alright book for Neurochemistry. When they say basic, they definitely mean basic. Still, there were a few useful aspects. Read full review

Review: Basic Neurochemistry: Molecular, Cellular and Medical Aspects [With CDROM]

User Review  - ♥Xeni♥ - Goodreads

An alright book for Neurochemistry. When they say basic, they definitely mean basic. Still, there were a few useful aspects. Read full review

Contents

Cellular Neurochemistry and Neural Membranes
1
Intercellular Signaling
164
Intracellular Signaling
333
Growth Development and Differentiation
435
Metabolism
529
Inherited and Neurodegenerative Diseases
617
Sensory Transduction
805
Neural Processing and Behavior
841
Glossary
963
Index
969
Copyright

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Page 18 - Raff, MC, Miller, RH, and Noble, M., 1983, A glial progenitor cell that develops in vitro into an astrocyte or an oligodendrocyte depending on culture medium, Nature, 303:390.
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About the author (2005)

OBITUARY FOR R. WAYNE ALBERS, August 5, 1928 - September 28, 2013

R. Wayne Albers, Ph.D., Scientist Emeritus, Chief of Section on Enzyme Chemistry (retired), Laboratory of Neurochemistry in the NINDS, NIH, Bethesda, MD, is a world-recognized neuroscientist most noted for his research in the field of membrane cation transport and neuronal excitability in the nervous system. Dr. Albers and physiologist R.L. Post performed the principal experiments leading to their now widely-held Albers-Post model for the mechanism of the cation transport enzyme, sodium-potassium-activated ATPase. Dr. Albers was one of the founding co-editors of the comprehensive text, Basic Neurochemistry: Molecular, Cellular and Medical Aspects, first published in 1972, continuing as co-editor for 8 editions, the latest having been published in 2012. After receiving his PhD at Washington University School of Medicine in 1954, Dr. Albers embarked on a distinguished career of research at the NIH, being a founding investigator in the first Laboratory of Neurochemistry.

Dr. Albers was one of the first members of the American Society for Neurochemistry at its inception, serving on its Council and its Committees on Publications and Education and on Electronic Publications. He has served as Professor of Biochemistry at George Washington University, Faculty Member of the NIH Foundation for Advanced Education in the Sciences, Associate Editor of the Journal of Neurochemistry and of Experimental Neurology, and on the editorial boards of several journals.

Dr. Albers passed away on September 28, 2013. He was 85 years old and is survived by his former wife, Frances Albers, their children Gail Morrell, Belinda Caron and Patricia Steinhoff, 6 grandchildren, and 8 great-grandchildren. He also had a son, the late Jonathan Albers.

Dr. Albers was considered a gentleman, an excellent scientific colleague with a keen intellect and friend by all who worked with him. He will be sorely missed, not only by his family, but also by the entire neurochemistry community.

George J. Siegel
October 1, 2013

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