Here I Stand

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Beacon Press, 1988 - Biography & Autobiography - 121 pages
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Robeson's international achievements as a singer and actor in starring roles on stage and screen made him the most celebrated black American of his day, but his outspoken criticism of racism in the United States, his strong support of African independence, and his fascination with the Soviet Union placed him under the debilitating scrutiny of McCarthyism. Blacklisted, his famed voice silenced, Here I Standoffered a bold answer to his accusers. It remains today a defiant challenge to the prevailing fear and racism that continues to characterize American society.
 

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User Review  - nbmars - LibraryThing

Here I Stand, by Paul Robeson, was first published in 1958, and reissued in 1971 and 1988. It sets out his thoughts about the pressing issues of race in the 1950's, and about the accusations that had ... Read full review

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That good story that makes me want to be likes that

Selected pages

Contents

I TAKE MY STAND
28
LOVE WILL FIND OUT THE WAY
48
OUR RIGHT TO TRAVEL
63
THE TIME IS NOW
74
THE POWER OF NEGRO ACTION
90
OUR CHILDREN OUR WORLD
109
APPENDIX
112
Copyright

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About the author (1988)

Paul Leroy Robeson (April 9, 1898 - January 23, 1976) was an American concert singer (bass), recording artist, actor, athlete, scholar who was an advocate for the Civil Rights Movement in the first half of the 20th century. He gained international attention for his work in the arts and he merged his artistic career with political activism to speak out for the equality of minorities and the rights of workers throughout the world. His friendship with the Soviet Union and the Soviet peoples plus criticism of the lack of progress in civil rights in the United States at the outset of the Cold War and during the age of McCarthyism brought scrutiny, conflict and retribution from the American government. His public persona became diminished, his income plummeted and he faced isolation from the Civil Rights Movement in the second half of the 20th century.

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