The Story of Burnt Njal: Or, Life in Iceland at the End of the Tenth Century. From the Icelandic of the Njals Saga, Volume 1

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Sir George Webbe Dasent
Edmonston and Douglas, 1861 - Iceland - 507 pages
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Page 4 - So she went up to him, and he took her by the chin and kissed her ; after that she went away. Then Hauskuld said to Hrut, ' What dost thou think of this maiden ? Is she not fair ? ' Hrut held his peace. Hauskuld said the same thing to him a second time, and then Hrut answered, ' Fair enough is this maid, and many will smart for it ; but this I know not, whence thief's eyes have come into our race.
Page 238 - Fair is the Lithe — so fair, that it has never seemed to me so fair; the corn-fields are white to harvest, and the home mead is mown ; and now I will ride back home, and not fare abroad at all.
Page 62 - He was a tall man in growth, and a strong man — best skilled in arms of all men. He could cut or thrust or shoot if he chose as well with his left as with his right hand, and he smote so swiftly with his sword, that three seemed to flash through the air at once.
Page vii - Much passes for history in other lands on far slighter grounds, and many a story in Thucydides or Tacitus, or even in Clarendon or Hume, is believed on evidence not one-tenth part so trustworthy as that which supports the narratives of these Icelandic story-tellers of the eleventh century.
Page 73 - So they went on, till Hrut, in answer told him how the suit must be taken up, and recited the summons. Hedinn repeated it all wrong, and Hrut burst out laughing, and had no mistrust. Then he said, Hrut must summon once more, and Hrut did so. Then Hedinn repeated the summons a second time, and this time right, and called his companions to witness how he summoned Hrut in a suit which Unna, Mord's daughter, had made over to him with her plighted hand.
Page 4 - ... on great matters. It happened once that Hauskuld bade his friends to a feast, and his brother Hrut was there and sat next him. Hauskuld had a daughter named Hallgerda, who was playing on the floor with some other girls. She was fair of face and tall of growth, and her hair was as soft as silk ; it was so long, too, that it came down to her waist. Hauskuld called out to her, "Come hither to me, daughter.
Page 234 - ... called on to challenge the inquest, finding uttered, witness taken to the finding." He took this witness to all the steps that had been taken in the suit. Then that man stood up over whose head the suit had been declared and pleaded, and summed up the case. He summed up first how Mord had bade them listen to his oath, and to his declaration of the suit, and to all the steps and proofs in it; then he summed up next how Mord took his oath and his vouchers theirs ; then he summed up how Mord pleaded...
Page 32 - THORWALD GETS HALLGERDA TO WIFE Now, it must be told how Hallgerda, Hauskuld's daughter, grows up, and is the fairest of women to look on; she was tall of stature, too, and therefore she was called
Page 184 - Gunnar, in his turn, called on Geir the Priest to listen to his oath, and to the defence which he was about to bring forward in the suit. Then he took the oath and said, "This defence I make to this suit, that I took witness and outlawed Otkell before my neighbours for that bloody wound which I got when Otkell gave me a hurt with his spur; but thee, Geir the Priest, I forbid by a lawful protest made before a priest, to pursue this suit, and so, too, I forbid the judges to hear it; and with this I...
Page 185 - It seems to us as though the most peaceful way would be that a settlement and atonement were come to in the suit. But why sayest thou so little, Gizur the White?" "It seems to me," says Gizur, "as though we shall need to have strong props for our suit; we may see, too, that Gunnar's friends stand near him, and so the best turn for us that things can take will be that good men and true should utter an award on the suit, if Gunnar so wills it.

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