A journal of the campaign in Portugal and Spain, containing remarks on the inhabitants, customs, trade, and cultivation, of those countries, from the year 1809 to 1812

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C. Duffield, 1812 - History - 103 pages
 

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Page 38 - Elvas is 184 miles; over which space 1 have had to conduct this disorderly crew, without magazines. In many places the Magistrates shewing evident marks of a hostile inclination, and no where inclined to serve us — the people of the country have every where treated the unfortunate men, who have sacrificed themselves to save Spain, with inhumanity and neglect — and I was often obliged to use violent means to prevent the men from starving. Such has been our reception in Spain...
Page 36 - General \Vhittingham, who was wounded, and Col. Roach, officers serving with the Spanish army. The sick were principally placed in the large convents of the town, some in deserted houses. The confusion and scenes of death can scarcely be described : many men till this day never having had their wounds dressed. As far as I could ever collect, the number of men, attached, and forming part of this hospital, could not have been far short of 5,000.
Page 37 - Poute de Archibespo, where I purposed passing the night, we were overtaken by the British army, I was ordered by the Adjutant-General to proceed with my party to Valdecasa that night ; but finding the Bridge over the Tagus occupied by our retreating army and their baggage, it was dark before I could get in motion. Forty bullock-cars having been furnished me, in addition to the means I had already of transporting the sick, and which were in such a state, and Jthe road so bad, tliat only eleven of...
Page 93 - For only 241 years was that beautiful and venerable pile allowed to stand entire, when, in 1 5 59, it was desecrated by a savage mob, and abandoned to the ravage of the elements, and to the still more relentless hands of the dwellers in St. Andrews. Besides the Cathedral and the Priory, in time there arose two other monasteries, one of the Black-hooded Friars, a remnant of whose church still stands in South Street ; the other, a monastery of the Gray or Franciscan Friars, whose foundation has wholly...
Page 64 - I think, that the air in parts of South America, is so very transparent, that you can distinguish the white garment of a man, at (I think) 15 miles distance ; I have made the same remark in this country ; I could, from the top of a mountain, distinguish, with the naked eye, a white house where I...
Page 42 - I know not any nation,' says General Mackinnon, ' where there appears to be more purity of morals than in Portugal. They have ill this country a peculiar virtue, from the kindness with which they treat servants, many of whom, attached to the same family from one generation to another, acquire by their savings small properties, which in time enable them to rise and become...
Page 101 - He was supposed, however, during the whole of the night, to be living, and his body was not discovered till the next morning, wounded and scorched on the back of the head. It was first interred by some pioneers, under the order of General Picton, in the breach ; but was afterwards removed by the officers of the Coldstream Guards...
Page 17 - Monte Alegro, which is limpid in the extreme, not even discoloured by the rain. There is a bridge and fall near ReuVannes, equal to any thing in Switzerland for beauty : upon the whole the mountain scenery is not surpassed in any part of the world ; the industrious inhabitants have cultivated every spot where soil is to be found. The mountains, to a certain height,, are covered with wild chesnut : these and maize constitute the food of the inhabitants, who are a fine race of people, at least the...
Page 18 - ... up at half-past two, and go to bed again at half-past ten. They are only allowed to go to a country-seat thirty days in the year, and on particular occasions to pay visits in the town ; but they must go in their carriage, as they are not permitted to walk the streets. If a monk has a sister, he is only allowed to see her once in the year. This convent is of the order of St. Augustine ; the monks are called canons regular ; there ought to be eighty monks agreeable to the institution, but they...
Page 16 - Speaking of one of the affairs in the pursuit, he says, ' I was near him, by his orders, when the attack was about to commence ; and if I had never seen him but at that moment, I could decide upon his being a man of a great mind.

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