The Common English Names of Plants

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Printed at the "Chronicle" Office, 1873 - Plant names, Popular - 27 pages
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Page 23 - Ah, what a life were this! how sweet! how lovely ! Gives not the hawthorn bush a sweeter shade To shepherds, looking on their silly sheep, Than doth a rich embroider'd canopy To kings, that fear their subjects' treachery ? O, yes it doth ; a thousand-fold it doth.
Page 9 - I'll sweeten thy sad grave : thou shall not lack The flower that's like thy face, pale primrose ; nor The azured hare-bell, like thy veins ; no, nor The leaf of eglantine, whom not to slander, Out-sweeten'd not thy breath...
Page 21 - We have short time to stay, as you, We have as short a Spring ; As quick a growth to meet decay As you, or any thing. We die, As your hours do, and dry Away Like to the Summer's rain ; Or as the pearls of morning's dew, Ne'er to be found again.
Page 21 - You haste away so soon: As yet the early-rising sun Has not attained his noon. Stay, stay, Until the hasting day Has run But to the evensong; And, having prayed together, we Will go with you along. We have short time to stay as you; We have as short a spring; As quick a growth to meet decay, As you or anything. We die, As your hours do, and dry Away Like to the summer's rain; Or as the pearls of morning's dew, Ne'er to be found again.
Page 11 - ... full of roses. And these were the first rose-trees and roses, both white and red, that ever any man saw ; and thus was this maiden saved by the grace of God.
Page 9 - I, who pretended no title to them, took in his fields; for I could there sit quietly, and, looking on the water, see some fishes sport themselves in the silver streams, others leaping at flies of several shapes and colours; looking on the hills, I could behold them spotted with woods and groves; looking down the meadows, could see here a boy gathering Lilies and Ladysmocks, and there a girl cropping Culverkeys and Cowslips, all to make Garlands suitable to this present month of May...
Page 20 - A THING of beauty is a joy for ever: Its loveliness increases; it will never Pass into nothingness; but still will keep A bower quiet for us, and a sleep Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing.
Page 11 - And, as the fire began to burn about her, she made her prayers to our Lord, — that as wisely as she was not guilty of that sin, that he would help her and make it to be known to all men, of his merciful grace. And when she had thus said, she entered into the fire, and anon was the fire quenched and out ; and the brands that were burning became red...
Page 11 - ... known to all men, of his merciful grace. And when she had thus said, she entered into the fire, and anon was the fire quenched and out ; and the brands that were burning became red rose-trees, and the brands that were not kindled became white rosetrees, full of roses.
Page 4 - The cormorant was once a wool merchant. He entered into partnership with the bramble and the bat, and they freighted a large ship with wool. She was wrecked, and the firm became bankrupt. Since that disaster the bat skulks about till midnight to avoid his creditors, the cormorant is for ever diving into the deep to discover its foundered vessel, while the bramble seizes hold of every passing sheep to make up his loss by stealing the wool.

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