Hebrew Inscriptions: From the Valleys Between Egypt and Mount Sinai, in Their Original Characters, with Translations and an Alphabet

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J. R. Smith, 1875 - Inscriptions - 108 pages
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Page 21 - If ye be willing and obedient, ye shall eat the good of the land : But if ye refuse and rebel, Ye shall be devoured with the sword: For the mouth of the Lord hath spoken it.
Page viii - THE DECREE OF CANOPUS, in Hieroglyphics and Greek, with translations and an explanation of the hieroglyphical characters, 7s 6d. THE ROSETTA STONE in Hieroglyphics and Greek, with translations and an explanation of the hieroglyphical characters, and followed by an appendix of kings
Page viii - THE ROSETTA STONE in Hieroglyphics and Greek, with translations and an explanation of the hieroglyphical characters, and followed by an appendix of kings
Page 2 - The burden of the beasts of the south : into the land of trouble and anguish, from whence come the young and old lion, the viper and fiery flying serpent, they will carry their riches upon the shoulders of young asses, and their treasures upon the bunches of camels, to a people that shall not profit them. 7 For the Egyptians shall help in vain, and to no purpose: therefore have I cried concerning this, Their strength is to sit still.
Page 52 - For the bed is too short for a man to stretch himself; And the covering too narrow when he gathereth himself up.
Page iv - Beer's transcripts without translations, nor Mr. Forster's translations without transcripts. Professor Palmer's work has neither transcripts nor translations. The decipherer should produce first an alphabet or table of characters, and then to some extent a language, and, lastly, a probable meaning to each sentence.
Page 90 - ... two young pigeons, one for a sin offering, and one for a burnt-offering.
Page 90 - Leviticus v. 11, 12, a person who was not rich enough to bring such a gift might bring a tenth part of an ephah of fine flour, of which the priest was to burn upon the altar a handful as a memorial.

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