The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Volume 8

Front Cover
Henry G. Bohn, 1857 - Political science
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 473 - What's Hecuba to him, or he to Hecuba, That he should weep for her/ What would he do, Had he the motive and the cue for passion That I have...
Page 201 - Sir, the Nabob having determined to inflict corporal punishment upon the prisoners under your guard, this is to desire that his officers, when they shall come, may have free access to the prisoners, and be permitted to do with them as they shall see proper.
Page 470 - I do not think the congress have any wish to persecute General Burgoyne. I never heard till I received your letter that they had recalled him. If they have made such a resolution, it must be, I suppose, a conditional one ; — to take place in case their offer of exchanging him for Mr. Laurens should not be accepted — a resolution intended to enforce that offer.
Page 470 - I do not think the Congress have any wish to persecute General Burgoyne. I never heard, till I received your letter, that they had recalled him ; if they have made such a resolution, it must be, I suppose, a conditional one, to take place in case their offer of exchanging him for Mr. Laurens should not be accepted ; a resolution intended merely to enforce that offer.
Page 198 - I am sorry it is not in my power to comply with your proposal of easing the prisoners for a few days of their fetters. Much as my humanity may be touched by their sufferings, I should think it inexpedient to afford them any alleviation while they persist in a breach of their contract with me : and, indeed, no indulgence can...
Page 473 - I tell you again, — that the recollection of the manner in which I saw the queen of France, in the year 1774, and the contrast between that brilliancy, splendour, and beauty, with the prostrate homage of a nation to her, — and the abominable scene of 1789, which I was describing, — did draw tears from me and wetted my paper. These tears came again into my eyes, almost as often as I looked at the description ; — they may again.
Page 450 - ... rather against that practice, and have given several reasons for your judgment, which deserve to be very well considered. In order to know how we ought to plough, we ought to know what end it is we propose to ourselves in that operation. The first and instrumental end is to divide the soil ; the last and ultimate end, so far as regards the plants, is to facilitate the pushing of the blade upwards, and the shooting of the roots in all the inferior directions. There is further proposed a more ready...
Page 349 - For now the surgeon must be paid, To whom those perquisites are gone In Christian justice due to John. When food and raiment now grew scarce, Fate put a period to the farce, And with exact poetic justice; For John is landlord, Phyllis hostess: They keep, at Staines, the Old Blue Boar, Are cat and dog, and rogue and whore.
Page 100 - Sekunderpoor, beginning about a coss before he reached the village, an old fort of that name, appeared to a little more advantage; but even here the crops seem very scanty, and the ground more than half fallow.
Page 298 - He began with urging as apologies, that whilst he was not certain of the extent of our demands upon him, he had no real interest in being economical in his expenses; and that while we interfered in the internal management of his affairs, his own authority and that of his Ministers, were despised by his own subjects.

Bibliographic information