License to Steal: Nevada's Gaming Control System in the Megaresort Age

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University of Nevada Press, 2005 - Business & Economics - 263 pages
4 Reviews
Seven precedent-setting case studies taken from the files of the Nevada Gaming Control Board illustrate vital issues addressed in the first decade of the megaresorts.
 

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User Review  - figre - LibraryThing

How do you take something as exciting as crime and stupidity in Las Vegas and make it boring? Jeff Burbank does a pretty good job of showing us how. And, really, the reason becomes evident quite ... Read full review

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I am the author of this book. There have been some scurrilous, multiple so-called "reviews" by people apparently related to or associated with Joseph Slyman, mentioned in one chapter of my book about the serious accounting problems in the 1980s at the former Royal casino, across the Las Vegas Strip from the former Royal Nevada casino.
In my opinion, these "reviews" are a conflict of interest and reflect on the people writing them who are upset at how Mr. Slyman is portrayed in my book. Well, I attended the Gaming Board and Commission meetings in which he appeared, wrote daily news stories about him, bought the meetings' transcripts and interviewed gaming board members for my book. What he did while running the Royal casinos is in black and white and he lost his gaming license for it. I reported why and how in the book.
I am a journalist who wrote "License to Steal" based on the reporting, research and many interviews I did while covering gaming for the daily Las Vegas Sun and Las Vegas Review-Journal in the 1980s and 1990s. I've also written stories for The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, New York Daily News, San Francisco Chronicle and the Hartford Courant. In 2000, I received the statewide Outstanding Journalist award from the Nevada Press Association. I appeared on MSNBC, "Breaking Vegas (based on the chapter in this book about Ron Harris)," "E True Hollywood Story" and dozens of radio shows. I also had a short speaking part, as a gaming board member, in the movie "Casino." I am a graduate of U.C. Berkeley and have a M.A. in communications-print journalism from American University in Washington, D.C.
To say I was "never involved" with gaming in Las Vegas is absurd, as I for years covered the city's largest industry for two daily newspapers and a monthly trade magazine. Do the writers of these "reviews" believe that journalists cannot write books? Seriously?
I ask readers to judge my book by reading it, and take these "reviews" with very, very large grains of salt. Thank you.
Sincerely,
Jeff Burbank
author, "License to Steal: Nevada's Gaming Control System in the Megaresort Age"
 

Contents

Chapter
35
Chapter
55
Chapter Three
80
Chapter Four
104
Chapter Five
128
Chapter
156
Chapter Seven
187
Chapter Eight
207
Appendix
223
Selected Bibliography
249
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Jeff Burbank is a longtime journalist and editor. He holds a bachelor's degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master's degree in communications-print journalism from American University. He is the author of License to Steal: Nevada's Gaming Control System in the Megaresort Age (Nevada, 2000), Las Vegas Babylon (M. Evans, 2005), and Historic Photos of Las Vegas (Turner Publishing 2007). He has been published in many venues, including The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Hartford Courant, San Francisco Chronicle, Boston Globe, Las Vegas Review-Journal and Sun, Reno Gazette-Journal, and Newsweek. He is currently an instructor for the English Department at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

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