The Dictionary of Dainty Breakfasts

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Cassell, 1899 - Breakfasts - 139 pages
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Page 141 - It seems to us that this book is absolutely what it claims to be — that is, the largest and most complete collection of the kind ever produced in this country...
Page 113 - Put a bit of butter or dripping into a clean fryingpan ; as soon as it is melted (before it gets hot) put in the sausages, and shake the pan for a minute, and keep turning them (be careful not to break or prick them in so doing) ; fry them over a very slow fire till they are nicely browned on all sides ; when they are done, lay them on a hair sieve, placed before the fire for a couple of minutes to drain the fat from them.
Page 141 - is one of the most thorough and comprehensive works of the kind. To expatiate on its abundant contents would demand pages rather than paragraphs." — Th* Time*. Cassell's Domestic Dictionary. Uniform with " Cassell's Dictionary of Cookery.
Page 143 - A Year's Cookery. Giving Dishes for Breakfast, Luncheon, and Dinner for Every Day in the Year, with Practical Instructions for their Preparation. By PHILLIS BROWNE. Cheap Edition, cloth, 3s. 6d. What Girls Can Do. A Book for Mothers and Daughters. By PHILLIS BROWNE, Author of "A Year's Cookery,
Page 143 - Browne, with bills of fare for every day in the year, with directions for cooking, for marketing, and for making arrangements for the next day, makes up an invaluable present for young housekeepers.
Page 113 - Dripping (No. 83), into a clean Frying-pan ; as soon as it is melted (before it gets hot) put in the Sausages, and shake the pan for a minute, and keep turning them, (be careful not to break or prick them in so doing), fry them over a very slow fire, till they are nicely browned on all sides, — when they are done, lay them on a hair sieve, placed before the fire for a couple of minutes to drain the fat from them.
Page 143 - It covers the whole of our lives in all their varying phases, and is as pleasantly written as it is instructive."—The Queen.
Page 19 - ... exceedingly hot (use no fat), drop in the chop, count ten and turn, repeating for about one minute, then draw the pan to the back or side of the stove and finish cooking slowly. A chop one inch thick will be perfectly done in from five to seven minutes. If the pan is hot enough at first there will be no loss of juice or flavor. Season and serve in the same manner as broiled chops. CHOPS (OR BIRDS) BROILED IN PAPER1 Prepare a chop as for pan-broiling.
Page 43 - Thoroughly work the whole well together until incorporated. The batter when finished should be of the consistency of thick cream, somewhat elastic, and perfectly smooth. Cover the pan with a cloth and keep it in a warm temperature to enable it to rise in the pan to about twice its original bulk. It must then be quickly worked for a minute to reduce it to its' original bulk, and allowed again to rise.

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