Greek Fragments in Postmodern Frames: Rewriting Tragedy 1970-2005

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 2017 - Literary Collections - 195 pages
Greek Fragments in Postmodern Frames takes as its subject adaptation of Greek tragedy in the last decades, arguing that rewritings of Greek tragic texts in this period can be used as a tool to uncover a significant dialogue with postmodernism. Despite the large number of staged and written adaptations of Greek tragic texts in recent years, the idea still persists that tragedy is incompatible with postmodernism, with the long-standing debate over the demise of the genre in the modern era undergoing a recent resurgence with the claim that postmodernism precludes tragedy both as an aesthetic form and as a way of perceiving the world. This volume focuses on the adaptation of Greek tragedy between 1970 and 2005 and explores a wide range of adaptations from a variety of different countries: the plays under discussion are characterized by an extended intertextual engagement with their prototype texts - instead of simply adapting the Greek myth, they rewrite the classical text in ways akin to the renegotiation of authorship and textuality proffered by poststructuralist thought. Such adaptive strategies are not only integral to the wider problematics of interrogating the authority of the classical canon and the power structures embedded in its reception, but also have also given rise to the development of peculiar tragic modes and tropes towards the end of the twentieth and into the twenty-first century. In analysing these tropes and demonstrating the ways in which Greek tragic texts have been rethought and rewritten in the adaptions presented, this volume seeks on the one hand to show how tragedy continues to provide a means of articulating contemporary cultural and political preoccupations, while on the other it draws upon a cultural materialist methodology to resist fixed definitions of tragedy and to question established frames and representations.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Tragic TransFormations Greek Tragedy and Postmodernism
1
Tragedy and Modern Critical Debate
13
Viewing through the Frame of Tragedy
39
Tragic Absences and Metatheatrical Performances
73
From AuthorGod to Textual Communion
103
Textual Fragments and Sexual Politics
131
Conclusion
167
Bibliography
173
Index of Names
187
General Index
191
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2017)


Eleftheria Ioannidou is Lecturer in Drama at the University of Birmingham. From 2010 until 2012 she held a Humboldt Research Fellowship at the Freie Universitat, Berlin, and had previously studied theatre in Athens and Royal Holloway, London, and read for a doctorate at the University of Oxford, working on the reception of Greek tragic texts in recent decades. Her ongoing research focuses on the political and ideological appropriation of Greek tragedy under fascist regimes in the inter-war period and also explores the impact of the economic crisis on Greek theatre and culture.

Bibliographic information