The Function of Newspapers in Society: A Global Perspective

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Shannon E. Martin, David A. Copeland
Greenwood Publishing Group, 2003 - Business & Economics - 179 pages
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The demise of the newspaper has long been predicted. Yet newspapers continue to survive globally despite competition from radio, television, and now the Internet, because they serve core social functions in successful cultures. Initial chapters of this book provide an overview of the development of modern newspapers. Subsequent chapters examine particular societies and geographic regions to see what common traits exist among the uses and forms of newspapers and those artifacts that carry the name newspaper but do not meet the commonly accepted definition. The conclusion suggests that newspapers are of such core value to a successful society that a timely and easily accessible news product will succeed despite, or perhaps because of, changes in reading habits and technology.

 

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Contents

Newspaper History Traditions
ix
Arab Cultures and Newspapers
9
African Cultures and Newspapers
27
Asian Cultures and Newspapers
43
Pacific Rim Cultures and Newspapers
57
Newspapers in Europe before 1500
75
Newspapers in Europe after 1500
85
Newspapers in the Americas
99
Newspapers in the Twentieth Century
123
American Daily Newspaper Evolution Past Present and Future?
135
Appendix
155
Index
167
List of Contributors
173
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

SHANNON E. MARTIN is Professor of Journalism at the University of Maine. She is the Author of Bits, Bytes and Big Brother: Federal Information Control in the Technological Age (Praeger, 1995) and Newspapers of Record in a Digital Age: From Hot Type to Hot Link (Praeger, 1998),

DAVID A. COPELAND is the A. J. Fletcher Professor of Communication at Elon University. A past president of the American Journalism Historians Association, he was named Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching Virginia Professor of the Year in 1998.

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