Camping on the Trail: Or, Some of My Experiences in the Indian Country

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American Arms Publishing Company, 1902 - Chinook jargon - 284 pages
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Page 215 - The eatable mushrooms at first appear very small and of a round form on a little stalk. They grow very fast, and the upper part and stalk are white. As the size increases, the under part gradually opens, and shows a fringed fur of a very fine salmon colour, which continues more or less till the mushroom has gained some size, and then turns to a dark brown.
Page 178 - The points to be aimed at are — first and immediately, the restoration of breathing; and secondly, after breathing is restored, the promotion of warmth and circulation. The efforts to restore...
Page 130 - The madrina (or godmother) is a most important personage. She is an old steady mare, with a little bell round her neck; and wheresoever she goes, the mules, like good children, follow her. If several large troops are turned into one field to graze, in the morning the muleteer has only to lead the madrinas a little apart, and tinkle their bells; and, although there may be 200 or 300 mules together, each immediately knows its own bell, and separates itself from the rest.
Page 113 - To every one hundred rations, fifteen pounds of beans or peas, or ten pounds of rice or hominy ; ten pounds of green coffee or eight pounds of roasted (or roasted and ground) coffee, or one pound and eight ounces of tea ; fifteen pounds of sugar; four quarts of vinegar ; one pound and four ounces of adamantine or star candles ; four pounds of soap ; three pounds and twelve ounces of salt ; four ounces of pepper ; thirty pounds of potatoes (when practicable) and one quart of molasses.
Page 130 - It is nearly impossible to lose an old mule; for if detained for several hours by force, she will, by the power of smell, like a dog, track out her companions, or rather the madrina, for, according to the muleteer, she is the chief object of affection. The feeling, however, is not of an individual nature ; for I believe I am right in saying that any animal with a bell will serve as a madrina.
Page 20 - ... pounds; from four to eight years old ; head and ears small; forehead broad; eyes large and prominent; vision perfect in every respect; shoulders long and sloping well back; chest full, broad and deep ; fore legs straight and standing well under; barrel large and increasing from girth toward flank; withers elevated; back short and straight; loins and haunches broad and muscular; hocks well bent and under the horse ; pasterns slanting and feet small and sound.
Page 130 - The affection of these animals for their madrina saves infinite trouble. It is nearly impossible to lose an old mule : for, if detained several hours by force, she will, by the power of smell, like a dog, track out her companions, or rather the madrina ; for, according to the muleteer, she is the chief object of affection. The feeling, however, is not of an individual nature; for I believe I am right in saying that any animal with a bell will serve as a madrina.
Page 112 - ... ounces of soft bread or flour, or, one pound of hard bread, or, one pound and four ounces of corn meal; and to every one hundred...
Page 85 - When getting sleepy, you return your rifle between your legs, roll over, and go to sleep. Some people may think this is a queer place for a rifle ; but, on the contrary, it is the position of all others where utility and comfort are most combined. The butt rests on the arm, and serves as a pillow for the head ; the muzzle points between the knees, and the arms encircle the lock and breech, so that you have a smooth pillow, and are always prepared to start up armed at a moment's notice.
Page 63 - ... much relief. A few drops of opium, in tincture, placed within the eyelids will also afford relief. Water and weak brandy is an excellent eye-wash. For sunstroke, remove the collar and stock, loosen the shirt and coat, and continue to throw cold water on the head and spine until consciousness returns. For wasp and scorpion stings, etc., extract the sting, if it remains in the wound, and rub acetic acid, the nicotine from a pipe or chewed tobacco, upon the wound. Rattlesnakes and venomous reptiles...

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