New Granada: Its Internal Resources

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A. H. Baily and Company, 1863 - Agricultural colonies - 154 pages
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Page 85 - Texas] twenty thousand miles, mostly on foot. During the whole of this period, I was not confined one month, put all my indispositions together, and not one moment, by any malady attributable to climate. I have slept in the open air for weeks together, in the hottest summer nights, and endured this mode of life in the most matted woods, perhaps, in the world. During my survey of the Sabine river, myself, and the men that attended me, existed, for several weeks, on flesh and fish, without bread or...
Page 18 - Marta, whence descend the numerous streams which water it in every direction. It is on these streams, several of which are navigable for some distance, and betwixt this ridge of mountains and the sea, a foreign settlement might, in my opinion, be most advantageously established ; the lands are unoccupied, with the exception of two small villages of peaceful and inoffensive Indians : they are eminently fertile, and capable of producing abundantly cocoa, coffee, cotton, sugar-cane, indigo, rice, tobacco,...
Page 76 - ... climate renders the culture of both tropical as well as northern staples practicable. Coffee, cotton, cocoa, indigo, sugar, tobacco, &c., flourish in the savannas east of the Andes, and are considered as articles of export ; the grain and nutritious roots, known in the West-Indies as ground provisions, are produced only in sufficient quantities for home consumption. Maize is grown every where, and when ripe, is pounded in wooden mortars into a coarse meal, there being no more perfect machinery...
Page 76 - ... agriculture of this state is generally much neglected, but the present government has felt itself called upon to attempt its improvement, and have concluded to forward the design by introducing foreigners from Europe and the United States of America, and the improved agricultural implements of those nations. The great variety of soil and climate renders the culture of both tropical as well as northern staples practicable. Coffee, cotton, cocoa, indigo, sugar, tobacco, &c., flourish in the savannas...
Page 97 - Nature has here been prodigal of her mineral wealth. Just north of the great Sabana are the mines of rock salt at Cipaquira. A little farther on are the iron mines of Pacho. The emeralds of the world come from Muzo and Somondoco. North of Muzo is the copper mine of Moniquira, and, lastly — to say nothing of tin, lead, and sulphur, none of which are systematically extracted — the gold deposits of the vicinity of Piedecuesta. But the most valuable of all mineral deposits is coal, and this, though...
Page 18 - Marta mountains to its north and south, and the towns of El Valle and Chiriguana to the east and west. It communicates with the Magdalena by a series of small lakes; with the interior by the Ocana mountains ; and with the seacoast by Santa Marta and Rio Hacha. It contains a length of about 30 leagues, with an indefinite breadth, towards the mountains, of alternate woods and savanahs, watered by abundant streams.
Page 18 - Hacha on the right, the latter within four or five hours ride or sail, and affording a market as well for produce raised, as for every article of consumption required in the colony ; add to which advantage, that the settler may be brought from Europe and landed on the very spot he intends to cultivate. The trade of...
Page 85 - ... according to the census tables, that in 1850, out of a white population of 6,184,477 persons of all ages and both sexes, there were 1,019,020 males, over fifteen years of age, engaged in out-door labour in the slave states, 803,052 being employed in purely agricultural pursuits.
Page 123 - Cauca, where the sugarcane grows in the same spot eighty years without the necessity of culture, and maize yields from 100 to 300 per cent. The plantain is so abundant, that an area of 10,000 square metres gives a product of 62,800 kilogrammes, which would sustain fifty-seven men for a year. The coffee of Popayan is as rich as that of Mocha, and the cinchona barks of Pitay6 are among the best known in commerce.
Page 18 - ... might, in my opinion, be most advantageously established ; the lands are unoccupied, with the exception of two small villages of peaceful and inoffensive Indians : they are eminently fertile, and capable of producing abundantly cocoa, coffee, cotton, sugarcane, indigo, rice, tobacco, maize, and all kinds of fruits and vegetables. There are large tracts of pasture lands of excellent quality for raising cattle. The climate is healthy, and the settler has the advantage, by ascending into the mountains,...

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