The pipe-rolls, or, Sheriff's annual accounts of the revenues of the crown: for the counties of Cumberland, Westmorland, and Durham, during the reigns of Henry I. [i.e. II], Richard I., and John

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Page xxvii - Also it is said that in the marches of Scotland some hold of the king by cornage, that is to say, to wind a horn to give men of the country warning when they hear that the Scots or other enemies are come, or will enter into England, which service is grand serjeanty.
Page xiv - Scotland, sometimes retained by the king himself, at others, held by a member of his family ; usually, if we may credit the national historians, by the proximate heir. The only circumstance which is recorded of it for many years, is its total devastation by Ethelred, king of England, AD 1000, at which time it is represented by Henry of Huntingdon as the principal rendezvous of the marauding Danes. In 1052, Macbeth held the Scottish throne, whilst Malcolm, the son of his predecessor, Duncan, sat on...
Page xliii - ... authority of the documents in the present volume. In the Pipe Roll of the 31st of Henry I., the name is spelt Westmarieland, in which form, or as Westmariland, it occurs throughout the reign of Henry II. In the succeeding reigns of Richard I., and John, the orthography is Westmerieland and Westmeriland. •de Meshines, of the Earldom of Carlisle.* Kendal, with all the rest of Amounderness, was in the hands of the Crown at the date of the compilation of Doomsday, but was afterwards in the possession...
Page liv - lightning'; the name is found in Phoenician, eg Barcas the father of Hannibal, and in Palmyrene and Sabaean (NSI,, p. 299). out of Kedesh-naphtali] also called K. in Galilee (Josh. xx. 7) to distinguish it from other places of the same name ; it is mentioned in the Amarna letters and in Egypt, documents ; the modern Kades 4 m. NW of the lake of Huleh represents the ancient site. But the presence of Kedesh in this chapter raises serious difficulties ; the town was too near Hazor, and too far from...
Page 235 - Sage', which is of the fee of the bishop of Chester. He has paid this into the Treasury. And he is quit. The same sheriff renders account for 28 shillings and 9 pence for the profit of Coton, which was in the possession of William, son of Alan, for a whole year and for a quarter of a year. He has paid this into the Treasury. And he is quit...
Page 239 - Adam his son for him renders account of fi7». for the old farm of Carlisle. And in works at the castle of Carlisle 67»., by the King's writ and by view of Adam and Robert, and Ralph the clerk, and Wulfric the engineer. And he is quit. — And the same for the new farm. In the Treasury 432. 9».
Page xxvii - ... when they hear that the Scots or other enemies are come or will enter into England ; which service is grand serjeanty. But if any tenant hold of any other lord, than of the king, by such service of cornage, this is not grand...
Page xlii - Rendal, of which the former was a portion of the antient Earldom of Carlisle ; the latter was included in Amounderness, which, at the period of the Doomsday survey, comprised, in addition, the South-western corner of Cumberland, all Lancashire North of the Ribble, and the Wapontake of Ewecross, in Yorkshire. The name of Westmorland was originally confined to the district of Appleby, which is still popularly known as the Barony of Westmorland. The position of this comparatively level tract, to the...
Page xi - Fordun, and although his testimony is of little weight when opposed by other authority, his statement in the present instance is so consistent with probability, that we may venture to receive it. He tells us, that " The indigenous inhabitants of certain provinces voluntarily submitted themselves to Gregory (the king, or, according to others, the regent, of Scotland), with their lands and possessions, offering to him an oath of fealty and homage, thinking it preferable to be subject to the Scots,...
Page 7 - Reinaldo de Luci iiij. m. 7 ij. g. 7 viij. d. Et quiet9 est. Et id redd Comp de Nouo Notegildo. In th. Iiij. ti. 7 vj. g. 7 viij. d. Et in pdon p br. fy. Witto de Neuitt c. 7 vj. g. 7 viij. d. Et Canon de Cart xxxvij. g. 7 iiij. d. Et Rob. de Vals xviij. ti. 7 xiij. g. 7 iij. dp Cartâ IJr.

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