Voigtländer and I in pursuit of shadow catching: a story of fifty-two years' companionship with a camera

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Cleveland Printing & Publishing Co., 1902 - Photography - 251 pages
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Page 83 - COME, ye sinners, poor and needy, Weak and wounded, sick and sore, Jesus ready stands to save you, Full of pity, love, and power: He is able, He is willing, doubt no more.
Page 161 - With soft winds round him sighing From the morn till close of day. Parents, brothers, sisters weeping, For their cup of sorrow's full, And his little playthings keeping, That he thought so beautiful — Tears from parents' eyes were starting For their little loving one.
Page 20 - It was no uncommon thing to find watch repairers, dentists, and other styles of business folk to carry daguerreotypy " on the side. " I have known blacksmiths and cobblers to double up with it, so it was possible to have a horse shod, your boots tapped, a tooth pulled or a likeness taken by the same man; verily, a man — a daguerreotype man, in his time, played many parts.
Page 158 - This \vould show that the Muse was getting in its work, as I might say, even while yet Julia was a little nut-brown maid trudging along to school with bare feet that looked like the back of a warty toad. In my visions I see her now standing in front of the teacher's desk, soaking the first three joints of her thumb in her rosebud mouth, and trying to work her off toe into a knot-hole in the floor, while outside, the turtle-dove and the masculine Michigan mule softly coo to their mates. A portrait...
Page 207 - ... America. But how did this thing happen? I will tell you. This Cleveland photographer happened to read in a German paper of a process practiced by the artists of Bohemia — a process of touching up the negative with the finest instruments, thus removing all chemical imperfections from the negative itself. Reading this, he sent for one of these artists, and at length succeeded in bringing the art of Bohemia into the service of his own profession. " The patient German sat down with his lenses,...
Page 162 - And now kind friends, what I have wrote, I hope you will pass o'er, . And not criticise as some have done, Hitherto herebefore...
Page 172 - For he was sick, and very bad — Poor boy, he thought, no doubt, If he came home in a smoking car His money would hold out.
Page 156 - It must be productive of good to humanity. If you have the good of your fellow creatures at heart, and would contribute your mite towards putting them in the way of finding this little volume, the thanks of a grateful people (including authoress and publisher) would be yours. If a sufficient success should attend the sale of this work, it is our purpose to complete the Washington Monument.
Page 158 - ... teacher's desk, soaking the first three joints of her thumb in her rosebud mouth, and trying to work her off toe into a knothole in the floor, while outside, the turtle-dove and the masculine Michigan mule softly coo to their mates. A portrait of the author appears . . . There are lines of care about the mouth — that is, part way . . . Lines of care will do anything . . . reasonable, but they can't reach around the North Park without getting fatigued. These lines look . . . as though the author...
Page 32 - Take my likeness, mister ?" The country lasses, ehy and sweet, give a modest bow as they meet the " likeness man." 1 was regarded with respect and supposed to be a prosperous young fellow. All were friendly and genial — save one. The blacksmith, a heavy, burly man, the muscular terror of the village, disapproved of me. Said I was a lazy dog, too lazy to do honest hard work and was humbugging and swindling the people of their hard earnings. He, for one, was ready to help drive me out of the village....

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