Horse Heaven

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Thorndike Press, 2000 - Fiction - 915 pages
9 Reviews
"It's not true", says a character in Jane Smiley's funny, passionate, and brilliant new novel of horse racing, "that anything can happen at the racetrack", but many astonishing and affecting things do -- and in Horse Heaven, we find them woven into a marvelous tapestry of joy and love, chicanery, folly, greed, and derring-do. The strange, compelling, sparkling and mysterious universe of horse racing that has fascinated generations has never before been depicted with such verve and originality, such tenderness, such clarity, and, above all, such sheer exuberance.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nancenwv - LibraryThing

I loved this book! The combination of a rich knowledge of horses, horse people, and racing was impressive but what I really loved was Smiley's cast of characters (including the horses and the Jack Russell terrier). She kept surprising me with her insight, her creativity,and her humor. Terrific. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - missreeka - LibraryThing

This is a big, sprawling book, so massive that it comes complete with a list of characters that is two pages long. And yes, the book jumps all over the place, from Belmont to Del Mar, even to Paris ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
28
Section 3
36
Copyright

44 other sections not shown

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About the author (2000)

Jane Smiley was born in Los Angeles, California on September 26, 1949. She received a B. A. at Vassar College in 1971 and an M. F. A. and a Ph.D from the University of Iowa. From 1981 to 1996, she taught undergrad and graduate creative writing workshops at Iowa State University. Her first critically acclaimed novel, The Greenlanders (1988), was preceded by three other novels and a highly regarded short story collection, The Age of Grief (1987). In 1985, she won an O. Henry Award for her short story Lily, which was published in The Atlantic Monthly. Her novel A Thousand Acres (1991) received both the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Pulitzer Prize. Her other works include Moo; Horse Heaven; and Ordinary Love and Good Will. In 2014 her title, Some Luck, made The New York Times Best Seller List.

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