The British Theatre; Or, A Collection of Plays: Which are Acted at the Theatres Royal, Drury Lane, Covent Garden, and Haymarket ...

Front Cover
Mrs. Inchbald
Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1808 - English drama
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 9 - Ay, your times were fine times indeed; you have been telling us of them for many a long year. Here we live in an old rumbling mansion, that looks for all the world like an inn, but that we never see company. Our best visitors are old Mrs. Oddfish, the curate's wife, and little Cripplegate, the lame dancing-master; and all our entertainment your old stories of Prince Eugene and the Duke of Marlborough. I hate such oldfashioned trumpery. Hard. And I love it. I love every thing that's old : old friends,...
Page 49 - In the first place, I shall be seen, and that is no small advantage to a girl who brings her face to market. Then I shall perhaps make an acquaintance, and that's no small victory gained over one who never addresses any but the wildest of her sex.
Page 29 - I don't know how — our Bridget, the cook-maid, is not very communicative upon these occasions. Should we send for her, she might scold us all out of the house.
Page 39 - I'm to have any good, let it come of itself; not to keep dinging it, dinging It into one so. Mrs. Hard. That's false; I never see you when you're in spirits. No, Tony, you then go to the ale-house or kennel. I'm never to be delighted with your agreeable, wild notes, unfeeling monster! Tony. Ecod! Mamma, your own notes are the wildest of the two.
Page 26 - Which might consist of about five thousand men, well appointed with stores, ammunition, and other implements of war. ' Now,' says the Duke of Marlborough to George Brooks, that stood next to him — You must have heard of George Brooks — ' I'll pawn my dukedom,' says he, 'but I take that garrison without spilling a drop of blood.
Page 18 - I own, Hastings, I am unwilling to lay myself under an obligation to every one I meet, and often stand the chance of an unmannerly answer.
Page 12 - Pray, my dear, disappoint them for one night at least. TONY. As for disappointing them, I should not so much mind; but I can't abide to disappoint myself.
Page 20 - We are to turn to the right, did you say ? Tony. No, no : straight forward. I'll just step myself, and show you a piece of the way. (To the landlord.) Mum.
Page 50 - And who wants to be acquainted with you? I want no such acquaintance, not I. I'm sure you did not treat Miss Hardcastle that was here awhile ago in this obstropalous manner.
Page 26 - It's not my way, you see, to receive my friends with my back to the fire. I like to give them a hearty reception in the old style at my gate. I like to see their horses and trunks taken care of.

Bibliographic information