Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Jan 6, 2009 - History - 496 pages

This groundbreaking historical expose unearths the lost stories of enslaved persons and their descendants who journeyed into freedom after the Emancipation Proclamation and then back into the shadow of involuntary servitude shortly thereafter in “The Age of Neoslavery.”

By turns moving, sobering, and shocking, this unprecedented Pulitzer Prize-winning account reveals the stories of those who fought unsuccessfully against the re-emergence of human labor trafficking, the companies that profited most from neoslavery, and the insidious legacy of racism that reverberates today.

Following the Emancipation Proclamation, convicts—mostly black men—were “leased” through forced labor camps operated by state and federal governments. Using a vast record of original documents and personal narratives, Douglas A. Blackmon brings to light one of the most shameful chapters in American history.

“An astonishing book. . . . It will challenge and change your understanding of what we were as Americans—and of what we are.” —Chicago Tribune

 

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User Review  - arosoff - LibraryThing

I majored in history in college, but I studied very little American history. My understanding of the post-Reconstruction period from high school history was somewhat hazy. I did understand that after ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - larryerick - LibraryThing

This is top-notch reporting of an unusually large portion of American history that stretches from the end of the American Civil War and early Reconstruction to the two World Wars. For reasons that are ... Read full review

Contents

A Note on Language
1
THE WEDDING
13
AN INDUSTRIAL SLAVERY
39
SLAVERYS INCREASE
58
GREEN COTT ENHAMS WORLD
84
THE SLAVE FARM OF JOHN PACE
117
We shall have to kill a thousand
155
THE INDICTMENTS
181
SLAVERY AFFIRMED
270
NEW SOUTH RISING
278
THE AR REST OF GREEN COTT ENHAM
299
ANATO MY OF A SLAVE MINE
310
EVERY WHERE WAS DEATH
324
ATLANTA THE SOUTHS FINEST CITY
338
XVII FREEDOM
371
The Ephemera of Catastrophe
383

A SUMMER OF TRIALS 1903
217
A RIVER OF ANGER
233
TEIE DISAPP ROBATION OF
246
Acknowledgments +4
407
Selected Bibliography
442
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

A native of Leland, Mississippi, Doug Blackmon is the Wall Street Journal's Atlanta Bureau Chief. He lives in Atlanta with his wife and their two children.

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