Gandhi: His Life and Message for the World

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Penguin, Nov 2, 2010 - Biography & Autobiography - 224 pages
This is the extraordinary story of how one man's indomitable spirit inspired a nation to triumph over tyranny. This is the story of Mahatma Gandhi, a man who owned nothing-and gained everything.
 

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User Review  - Awdhesh - LibraryThing

This biography of Gandhi is quite good showing the personality of Gandhi, which is not known to people generally. You enjoy reading this book and also learn history of his time. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kdtaylor27 - LibraryThing

I hate to say this, but I felt that this book made parts of Ghandi's life forgettable. The author glossed over many important things that happened to that great man. Don't get me wrong, it was well written and good for anyone looking for just a basic knowledge of the man. Read full review

Contents

The World Weeps
Blundering
Gandhi in London
Two Incidents Shape the Future
Color Prejudice
Courage Under Attack
The Transformation
Soul Force
Children of
The Magician
Personal
Jesus Christ and Mahatma Gandhi
Winston Churchill Versus Mohandas Gandhi
My Week with Gandhi
Frustration and Irritation
Jinnah Versus Gandhi

Happy Victory
Part Two GANDHI IN INDIA
Ears and Mouth Open January 9 1915March 23 1946
Mahatma Gandhi and the British
Blood
The Road to Jail
Gandhi Fasts
Answer to Moscow
The Salt of Freedom
The HalfNaked Fakir
In London in Minus Fours
Part Three VICTORY AND TRAGEDY
Seeking the Divine in Man March 24 1946January 30 1948
On the
Round and Round the Mulberry Bush
The Birth of Two Nations
Gandhi Hoes His Garden
Love on Troubled Waters
Victory Is to Him Who Is Ready to Pay the Price
Death Before Prayers
Photographs Index
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Louis Fischer was a journalist and lecturer. He wrote many books about the Soviet Union, including biographies and studies on Stalin. In 1958, he became a research associate at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. In 1961, he became a lecturer at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. He died in 1970.

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