A Naval History of the American Revolution, Volume 1

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Houghton Mifflin, 1913 - United States
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Page 339 - I was off their bay on the 13th instant, and sent my boat in the next day to know if the admiral would return my salute. He answered that he would return to me, as the senior American Continental officer in Europe, the same salute which he was authorized by his court to return to an admiral of Holland, or any other republic, which was four guns less than the salute given.
Page 349 - ... in the water; the jib shot away, and hanging in the water ; her sails and rigging entirely cut to pieces; her masts and yards all wounded, and her hull also very much galled.
Page 63 - ... two brigs and their cargoes, and secure the same for the use of the continent ; also any other transports, laden with ammunition, clothing, or other stores, for the use of the ministerial army or navy in America...
Page 67 - The plague, trouble, and vexation I have had with the crews of all the armed vessels, are inexpressible. I do believe there is not on earth a more disorderly set.
Page 44 - Territory, and also to kill, slay, destroy and conquer, by all fitting ways, enterprizes and means whatsoever, all and every such person and persons as shall at any time hereafter attempt or enterprize the destruction, invasion, detriment or annoyance of Our said Province or Territory...
Page 194 - That the flag of the Thirteen United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white: that the union be thirteen stars, white on a blue field, representing a new constellation.
Page 339 - Bay] the 13th and sent my boat in the next day to know if the Admiral would return my salute. He answered that he would return to me, as the senior American continental officer in Europe, the same salute which he was authorized by his court to return to an Admiral of Holland or of any other Republic, which was four guns less than the salute given.
Page 345 - When we had rowed to a considerable distance from the shore, the English began to run in vast numbers to their forts. Their disappointment may easily be imagined, when they found at least thirty heavy cannon, the instruments of their vengeance, rendered useless.
Page 9 - Foster, went in a small schooner. During the chase our people built them breastworks of pine boards and anything they could find in the vessels that would screen them from the enemy's fire.
Page 9 - ... stern, & made all the sail she could — but being a very dull sailor, they soon came up with her, and a most obstinate engagement ensued, both sides being determined to conquer or die : but the Tender was obliged to yield, her Captain was wounded in the breast with two balls, of which wounds he died next morning : poor Mr Avery was killed, and one of the marines, and five wounded. Only one of our men was killed and six wounded, one of which is since dead of his wounds.

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