Recent Social Trends in Bulgaria, 1960-1995

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, Jan 1, 2001 - Social Science - 688 pages
The introduction, by Nikolai Genov, looks at the challenges posed by two transformations: the experiment with communism, which ended in failure, and the current transition to a market economy and pluralist politics. Genov concludes that the major reason for Bulgaria's critical situation is the powerlessness of its state institutions. Considering life-style, fertility, leisure and consumption, inequality, religion, economic institutions, ethnicity, norms of conduct, and family, as well as other trends, Recent Social Trends in Bulgaria, 1960B1995 is the first comprehensive presentation of the major transformations that characterize Bulgaria at the turn of the century. The contributors not only consider a broad range of social phenomena but provide an in-depth analysis of social change. This national profile provides more data supporting the hypothesis of diversification, rather than convergence, in modern societies, a hypothesis proposed by the Comparative Charting of Social Change group after documenting social change in many countries.
 

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Contents

The Challenge of Two Transformations
1
0 Context
33
1 Age Groups
62
2 Microsocial
72
3 Women
107
4 Labour Market
138
5 Labour and Management
162
6 Social Stratification
180
9 Mobilizing Institutions
269
10 Institutionalization of Social Forces
302
11 Ideologies and Beliefs
325
12 Household Resources
353
13 LifeStyle
367
14 Leisure
409
15 Educational Attainment
426
16 Integration and Marginalization
440

7 Social Relations
218
8 State and Service Institutions
247
17 Attitudes and Values
470
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Page 12 - ... limits on individual initiative and responsibility. The beginning of the nineties brought about a new wave of rapid individualization in the region. The establishment of half a million private firms in Bulgaria is an impressive illustration of the scale of the process.

About the author (2001)

University of Sophia

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