Singer

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2009 - Fiction - 319 pages
3 Reviews
Against the backdrop of the Singer Sewing Company, a novel of phobias, obsessions, a string of motel fires, and a troubled friendship In the early 1980s,Milton Menger, a wealthy art dealer living in New Jersey, is called by an estranged friend, Charles Trembleman, with whom he’s had no contact in years. Charley is a traveling salesman for the Singer Sewing Company and his hands have just been badly burned in a motel fire near Memphis.He needs a driver so he can continue traveling and selling.Milty rises to the occasion.Together they embark on a journey across the South, visiting showrooms and staying in locally owned motels. Is it a coincidence that these motels keep going up in flames?
With a DeLillo-like nostalgia for Americana, combined with the dark humor of a Coen brothers film, Ira Sher’s storytelling draws the reader in like a moth to the flame.
 

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SINGER

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Sher's latest is a tale of obsession, insanity, dark humor, and nostalgia. It is also a classic road story, with two men sharing a car across the Deep South. Charles, a traveling salesman for Singer ... Read full review

Review: Singer

User Review  - Goodreads

I heard Ira Sher read one of his short stories on This American Life and was really blown away by it, so I decided to read one of his novels. His writing is really beautiful but can be stagnant and too wordy in some places. Overall, I enjoyed it. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
19
Section 3
58
Section 4
66
Section 5
72
Section 6
84
Section 7
98
Section 8
111
Section 11
192
Section 12
227
Section 13
239
Section 14
268
Section 15
274
Section 16
276
Section 17
294
Section 18
306

Section 9
137
Section 10
156
Section 19
321
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

IRA SHER is the author of Gentlemen of Space:A Novel. His short fiction has been published in journals including the Chicago Review and the Gettysburg Review and broadcast on This American Life. He has been honored as a finalist for the Pushcart Prize and The Best American Mystery Stories.

Bibliographic information