Cape Cod, Volume 2

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Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1896 - Cape Cod (Mass.) - 173 pages
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lovely nature writing on my favorite place in the world - Goodreads
Classic nature / travel writing, though uneven. - Goodreads
Thoreau explains landscapes in prose - Goodreads

Review: Cape Cod

User Review  - Brian Perusek - Goodreads

I started reading cape cod during my fifth or sixth journey there. I've now been to the cape more than any other location in my 30 years. I stumbled across the book at a visitor center and although ... Read full review

Review: Cape Cod

User Review  - Bonnie Mulvany - Goodreads

A good narrative of the area. I would have been more interested in the history if I lived there. Read full review

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Page 179 - for all weathers. This Cape is made by the main sea on the one side, and a great bay on the other, in form of a sickle." Champlain had already written,
Page 179 - had seen too much of the world to exaggerate, or even to dwell long on a part of it. In his "Description of New England," printed in 1616, after speaking of Accomack, since called Plymouth, he says : " Cape Cod is the next presents itself, which is only a headland of high hills of sand, overgrown with shrubby pines, hurts
Page 162 - appareled with a waistcoat and breeches of black serge, made after our seafashion, hoes and shoes on his feet; all the rest (saving one that had a pair of breeches of blue cloth) were naked." They appeared to have had dealings with
Page 71 - the inhabitants shouted Ne plus ultra (no more beyond), but the wind bore to us the truth only, plus ultra (more beyond), and over the Bay westward was echoed ultra (beyond). We spoke to them through the surf about the Far West, the true Hesperia,
Page 55 - which grow on the beach but such beds of beets and turnips, sprung originally from seeds which perhaps were cast on the waters for this end, though we do not know the Franklin which they came out of ? In ancient times some Mr. Bell (?) was sailing this way in his ark with seeds of rocket, saltwort, sandwort,
Page 71 - west now. At first we were abreast of that part of Portugal entre Douro e Mino, and then Galicia and the port of Pontevedra opened to us as we walked along; but we did not enter, the breakers ran so high. The
Page 42 - p. 372), on the subject of the tenth wave being " greater or more dangerous than any other," after quoting Ovid, — " Qui venit hie fluctus, fluctus supereminet omnes Posterior nono est, undecimo que prior," — says, " Which, notwithstanding, is evidently false; nor can it be made out either by observation either upon the shore
Page 110 - it chanced in this barren place suddenly to spring up without any tillage or sowing, great abundance of peason, whereof the poor gathered (as men judged) above one hundred quarters, yet remained some ripe and some blossoming, as
Page 104 - farm" on the edge of the desert, and is familiar with the fame of Provincetown, that one man had caught twenty-five snappingturtles there the previous spring. His own method of catching them was to put a toad on a mackerel-hook and cast it into a pond, tying the line to a stump or stake on shore.

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