Schiller's Homage of the Arts: With Miscellaneous Pieces from Rückert, Freiligrath, and Other German Poets

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James Munroe, 1847 - English poetry - 155 pages
 

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Page 108 - I considered that many had purchased a less good by a greater evil, the meed of glory by the loss of life ; but that I might procure great good by little suffering; that though I am blind, I might still discharge the most honourable duties, the performance of which, as it is something more durable than glory, ought to be an object of superior admiration and esteem ; I resolved, therefore, to make the short interval of sight, which was left me to enjoy, as beneficial as possible to the public interest.
Page 108 - I would not have listened to the voice even of Esculapius himself from the shrine of Epidauris, in preference to the suggestions of the heavenly monitor within my breast; my resolution was unshaken, though the alternative was either the loss of my sight, or the desertion of my duty...
Page 75 - Soon, in the far and wooded West Shall log-house walls therewith be graced ; Soon, many a tired, tawny guest Shall sweet refreshment from them taste. From them shall drink the Cherokee, Faint with the hot and dusty chase ; No more from German vintage, ye Shall bear them home, in leaf -crowned grace.
Page 108 - Thus, therefore, when I was publicly solicited to write a reply to the Defence of the Royal Cause — when I had to contend with the pressure of sickness, and with the apprehension of soon losing the sight of my remaining eye...
Page 39 - Five hundred years rolled by, and then I travelled the selfsame road again. And I found there a city, and far and near Resounded the hum of toil and glee, And I asked, " How long has the city been here? And where is the pipe, and the wood, and the sea?
Page 41 - The tree asunder burst with jubilant tone. To the dry trunk this grace from God was given, The wood of Passion should from thence be won. The blind world fashioned out of it the Cross, And its Salvation nailed with scorn thereon. Then bore the Tree of Life ensanguined fruit, Which whoso tasteth, life...
Page 37 - How long has this city been here?" And he answered me, and he plucked away, " It has always stood where it stands to-day, And here it will stand forever and aye." Five hundred years rolled by, and then I travelled the self-same road again. No trace of a city there I found ; A shepherd sat blowing his pipe alone...
Page 63 - ... kneeling, from the stagnant, slimy basin. Hark ! a rustling in the sedges ! with a roar, the lion springs On her back now. What a race-horse ! Say, in proudest stalls of kings, Saw one ever richer housings than the courser's motley hide, On whose back the tawny monarch of the beasts to-night will ride? Fixed his teeth are in the muscles of the nape, with greedy strain; Round the giant courser's withers waves the rider's yellow mane. With a hollow cry of anguish, leaps and flies the tortured steed...
Page 28 - T is Christmas eve, full plain : A strange child runs about, Through street and square and lane, To see the lights gleam out From every window-pane. Behold him stop and stare At every house : he sees The bright rooms, how they glare, And all the lamp-full trees, — Sad is he everywhere. The poor child weeps : " To-night Each little girl and boy Their little tree and light Can see and can enjoy : All, — all but me, — poor wight ! " Brothers and sisters, we Once frolicked, hand in hand, Around...
Page 38 - ... came to a sea, and the waves did roar, And a fisherman threw his net out clear, And when, heavy-laden, he dragged it ashore, I asked, " How long has the sea been here...

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